Harry Reid consoles the Netnuts

They're having the annual liberal Netnut soiree in Las Vegas this week and there is a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth over all that hasn't been accomplished by this, the most partisan liberal administration in history.

Libtalker Ed Schultz is mad at Obama because he won't appear on his show (almost as many people read this blog on a daily basis than watch Schultz). Nancy Pelosi came in for a round of boos because Don't Ask Don't Tell hasn't been repealed. There is almost as much criticism of Obama as there is of the right from speakers.

Then Harry Reid stepped to the mike and sought to placate everyone by promising that the public option was eventually going to be part of Obamacare.

Philip Klein of AmSpec blog:

"We're going to have a public option," Reid said. "It's just a question of when."Reid's general comments reflected the same overall message to progressives that President Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi delivered earlier today. It essentially boils down to: We've done a lot of stuff, but we still have a lot of unfinished business, so campaign for us again.

During a question and answer session, Reid also argued against "fear tactics of those who say Social Security is going broke. It's not."

This is part of a strategy I described earlier this week, with Democrats renewing the spectre of Social Security cuts to use as an issue to use against Republicans.

"Social Security is the most successful social program in the history of the world," he said.

Harry is right, although I might want to debate him about what "world" social security is successful. Not planet earth that's for sure. I'm certain that somewhere in the universe, social security is in fine shape, with fully funded mandates and no chance of the Ponzi scheme collapsing. Unfortunately, not all of us can travel that far.

The president's own deficit commission is warning about the coming social security shortfalls so either Harry Reid is a spectacular liar or he comes from a planet where the laws of basic economics do not apply.

Given the circumstances, I choose the latter.




They're having the annual liberal Netnut soiree in Las Vegas this week and there is a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth over all that hasn't been accomplished by this, the most partisan liberal administration in history.

Libtalker Ed Schultz is mad at Obama because he won't appear on his show (almost as many people read this blog on a daily basis than watch Schultz). Nancy Pelosi came in for a round of boos because Don't Ask Don't Tell hasn't been repealed. There is almost as much criticism of Obama as there is of the right from speakers.

Then Harry Reid stepped to the mike and sought to placate everyone by promising that the public option was eventually going to be part of Obamacare.

Philip Klein of AmSpec blog:

"We're going to have a public option," Reid said. "It's just a question of when."

Reid's general comments reflected the same overall message to progressives that President Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi delivered earlier today. It essentially boils down to: We've done a lot of stuff, but we still have a lot of unfinished business, so campaign for us again.

During a question and answer session, Reid also argued against "fear tactics of those who say Social Security is going broke. It's not."

This is part of a strategy I described earlier this week, with Democrats renewing the spectre of Social Security cuts to use as an issue to use against Republicans.

"Social Security is the most successful social program in the history of the world," he said.

Harry is right, although I might want to debate him about what "world" social security is successful. Not planet earth that's for sure. I'm certain that somewhere in the universe, social security is in fine shape, with fully funded mandates and no chance of the Ponzi scheme collapsing. Unfortunately, not all of us can travel that far.

The president's own deficit commission is warning about the coming social security shortfalls so either Harry Reid is a spectacular liar or he comes from a planet where the laws of basic economics do not apply.

Given the circumstances, I choose the latter.




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