Surprise! Scott Brown outpolls Kerry and Obama in MA

Rick Moran
Republican Senator Scott Brown must be doing something right. Latest polls from Massachusetts have the freshman senator (who is up for re-election in 2012) showing up senior senator John Kerry as well as President Obama in the heavily Democratic state:

After less than five months in Washington, Brown outpolls such Democratic stalwarts as President Obama and US Senator John F. Kerry in popularity, the poll indicates. He gets high marks not only from Republicans, but even a plurality of Democrats views him favorably.The support for Brown, whose victory became a symbol of voter anger, is consistent with widespread sentiment that incumbents in Massachusetts and Washington "need to be replaced with a new crop of leaders.'' That statement was supported by 50 percent of those polled, while 28 percent said they trust the incumbents.

Yet there's one surprising consolation for Bay State Democrats who hope to defuse the voter backlash. When asked whether they will vote for a Democrat or Republican in their own congressional district in November, 42 percent of likely voters say they will vote for the Democrat and 27 percent will vote Republican.

That last number reveals little. A generic Democrat will almost always defeat a generic Republican in a state that has a nearly 3-1 registration advantage for Democrats.

But put a name on the ballot and even in Massachusetts, people could be swayed to vote Republican - if it's the right kind of candidate. There are at least two Massachusetts House districts in play at the moment and more may be on the way if things continue to go south for the Democrats.

 

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky


Republican Senator Scott Brown must be doing something right. Latest polls from Massachusetts have the freshman senator (who is up for re-election in 2012) showing up senior senator John Kerry as well as President Obama in the heavily Democratic state:

After less than five months in Washington, Brown outpolls such Democratic stalwarts as President Obama and US Senator John F. Kerry in popularity, the poll indicates. He gets high marks not only from Republicans, but even a plurality of Democrats views him favorably.

The support for Brown, whose victory became a symbol of voter anger, is consistent with widespread sentiment that incumbents in Massachusetts and Washington "need to be replaced with a new crop of leaders.'' That statement was supported by 50 percent of those polled, while 28 percent said they trust the incumbents.

Yet there's one surprising consolation for Bay State Democrats who hope to defuse the voter backlash. When asked whether they will vote for a Democrat or Republican in their own congressional district in November, 42 percent of likely voters say they will vote for the Democrat and 27 percent will vote Republican.

That last number reveals little. A generic Democrat will almost always defeat a generic Republican in a state that has a nearly 3-1 registration advantage for Democrats.

But put a name on the ballot and even in Massachusetts, people could be swayed to vote Republican - if it's the right kind of candidate. There are at least two Massachusetts House districts in play at the moment and more may be on the way if things continue to go south for the Democrats.

 

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky