Save the Turtles. Kill the unborn.

Aside from the threat to the coastline, the indigenous wildlife inhabiting the Gulf of Mexico has suffered the most from the mounting environmental disaster. It is deeply disturbing when living beings are injured, let alone fished from the water after being immolated by fire. 

As the damaged oil rig spews millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf, BP is conducting "controlled burns to get rid of the oil." It is either that or the gooey substance will slather the coast line and throttle everything in its wake.  In order to deter the slick from reaching shore, and in an effort to contain the sludge within a certain radius, fire boom wicks are burning off the oil.

According to sea wildlife rescuer Captain Mike Ellis, many species, especially slow and cumbersome sea turtles, have been caught in the wake of the fire booms and literally burnt alive.  The process works like this: "They drag a boom between two shrimp boats and whatever gets caught between ... they circle it up and catch it on fire. Once the turtles are in there, they can't get out."

Time is short and with justified purpose and determined zeal, the oil situation has taken precedence over fishing out turtles trapped in nets whose destiny does not include living.   Hard choices are being made, and in the pecking order of priorities, protecting pelicans from being reduced to ash just doesn't rise to the same level as urgent coastline conservation and crude oil containment.

The thought is unbearable to imagine.  Sea turtles coated with oil struggling for the shore ensnared between two boats, lit on fire, and cremated alive. 

Yet one can't help but notice the similarity that scorched Gulf sea turtles have to babies aborted within the womb.  The only difference is that incinerated turtles can be seen with the naked eye while the preborn are hidden from view.

Captain Ellis said "most of the turtles seen are Kemps Ridley turtles, a critically endangered species. Harming or killing one would bring stiff civil and criminal penalties and fines of up to $50,000 against BP." 

Human fetuses can be legally killed, turtles cannot.  If you destroy a turtle you pay a hefty fine.  If slaying an unborn baby, the government both funds and supports your right to do so.

Environmentalists are demanding action on behalf of Gulf wildlife citing the tragedy in the following way: "When you consider all of the endangered turtles that have been killed either by the oil itself or ... burned alive in the oil, somebody needs to pay for it. Is anyone going to do anything about it?

America weeps over the oil rig disaster as untold gallons spew into the water, coat the coast and rain oil from heaven.  To make matters worse it seems juvenile turtles, hiding in sargassum seaweed together with aggregated crude are being trapped and torched alive. 

Yet while tears for the turtles flow each day thousands of innocent babies suffer the same excruciating demise, a plight that largely goes unnoticed and is defended as a right.

America sympathizes with dead turtles and oil-soaked pelicans.  However, it's time to address the more pressing issue: "When you consider the 50-million unborn children that have been killed... many burned alive ... who will pay?  And is anyone going to do anything about it?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

Aside from the threat to the coastline, the indigenous wildlife inhabiting the Gulf of Mexico has suffered the most from the mounting environmental disaster. It is deeply disturbing when living beings are injured, let alone fished from the water after being immolated by fire. 

As the damaged oil rig spews millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf, BP is conducting "controlled burns to get rid of the oil." It is either that or the gooey substance will slather the coast line and throttle everything in its wake.  In order to deter the slick from reaching shore, and in an effort to contain the sludge within a certain radius, fire boom wicks are burning off the oil.

According to sea wildlife rescuer Captain Mike Ellis, many species, especially slow and cumbersome sea turtles, have been caught in the wake of the fire booms and literally burnt alive.  The process works like this: "They drag a boom between two shrimp boats and whatever gets caught between ... they circle it up and catch it on fire. Once the turtles are in there, they can't get out."

Time is short and with justified purpose and determined zeal, the oil situation has taken precedence over fishing out turtles trapped in nets whose destiny does not include living.   Hard choices are being made, and in the pecking order of priorities, protecting pelicans from being reduced to ash just doesn't rise to the same level as urgent coastline conservation and crude oil containment.

The thought is unbearable to imagine.  Sea turtles coated with oil struggling for the shore ensnared between two boats, lit on fire, and cremated alive. 

Yet one can't help but notice the similarity that scorched Gulf sea turtles have to babies aborted within the womb.  The only difference is that incinerated turtles can be seen with the naked eye while the preborn are hidden from view.

Captain Ellis said "most of the turtles seen are Kemps Ridley turtles, a critically endangered species. Harming or killing one would bring stiff civil and criminal penalties and fines of up to $50,000 against BP." 

Human fetuses can be legally killed, turtles cannot.  If you destroy a turtle you pay a hefty fine.  If slaying an unborn baby, the government both funds and supports your right to do so.

Environmentalists are demanding action on behalf of Gulf wildlife citing the tragedy in the following way: "When you consider all of the endangered turtles that have been killed either by the oil itself or ... burned alive in the oil, somebody needs to pay for it. Is anyone going to do anything about it?

America weeps over the oil rig disaster as untold gallons spew into the water, coat the coast and rain oil from heaven.  To make matters worse it seems juvenile turtles, hiding in sargassum seaweed together with aggregated crude are being trapped and torched alive. 

Yet while tears for the turtles flow each day thousands of innocent babies suffer the same excruciating demise, a plight that largely goes unnoticed and is defended as a right.

America sympathizes with dead turtles and oil-soaked pelicans.  However, it's time to address the more pressing issue: "When you consider the 50-million unborn children that have been killed... many burned alive ... who will pay?  And is anyone going to do anything about it?


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

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