The silence of Hollywood in the face of murderous jihadis

Stella Paul
The street vendor in Times Square's theater district who called the cops about an explosive-laden SUV had a message for New Yorkers: "If you see something, say something."  But for normally talkative entertainment professionals -actors, directors, writers, producers - the watchword continues to be, "If you see something, shut up."

Avert your eyes from the death threats against South Park's creators, when their home addresses are published on the web, along with a photo of slaughtered Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh.  Refrain from issuing a statement of solidarity, either individually or through your union.  Zip your lips when Comedy Central immediately caves to the jihadist demands and censors the episode. Why make a big deal about it? It's not a life-or-death issue like, say, standing up for the right of child rapist Roman Polanski to go free.

Furthermore, it's best to pretend the Times Square bomb set near Comedy Central's owner, Viacom, is the handiwork of laughable amateurs and can't possibly have anything to do with the South Park threats.  Ignore the repercussions of the bomb exploding amidst throngs of Lion King theatergoers, scaring tourists away for months, if not years, decimating your union members' livelihood.  If you just keep concentrating on all the evils of Bush and Cheney and Wall Street fat cats, this whole stupid nuisance will disappear.

After all, this see-no-evil approach has worked terrifically, so far. When suicide bombers murdered Moustapha Akka, the producer of all eight "Halloween" horror films, in Amman, Jordan, the entire Hollywood community maintained serene silence. Hundreds had launched their careers and made a good living from his labors, but there was no point in paying public tribute to him, starting scholarships in his name or any of that boring stuff.  As for his gorgeous daughter Rima, 35, also murdered in the attack, whom so many had gone to school with at Beverly Hills High and USC, well, it really was a shame.  But it's hardly an outrage like Bill O'Reilly's latest remarks.

The American entertainment community's response to Islamic challenges was set in stone when Theo Van Gogh was knifed to death in the street for offending Muslim sensibilities with his film. Hollywood's collective shrug was heard around the world. No stirring speeches, no defiant editorials, not even a passing frame in the annual memoriam Oscar tribute.  No, Hollywood prefers to reserve that sacred honor for Leni Riefenstahl, Hitler's master propagandist.

Amidst the stunning challenges of our time, the entertainment community is cowering under the table.

Stella Paul blogs at StellaPundit
The street vendor in Times Square's theater district who called the cops about an explosive-laden SUV had a message for New Yorkers: "If you see something, say something."  But for normally talkative entertainment professionals -actors, directors, writers, producers - the watchword continues to be, "If you see something, shut up."

Avert your eyes from the death threats against South Park's creators, when their home addresses are published on the web, along with a photo of slaughtered Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh.  Refrain from issuing a statement of solidarity, either individually or through your union.  Zip your lips when Comedy Central immediately caves to the jihadist demands and censors the episode. Why make a big deal about it? It's not a life-or-death issue like, say, standing up for the right of child rapist Roman Polanski to go free.

Furthermore, it's best to pretend the Times Square bomb set near Comedy Central's owner, Viacom, is the handiwork of laughable amateurs and can't possibly have anything to do with the South Park threats.  Ignore the repercussions of the bomb exploding amidst throngs of Lion King theatergoers, scaring tourists away for months, if not years, decimating your union members' livelihood.  If you just keep concentrating on all the evils of Bush and Cheney and Wall Street fat cats, this whole stupid nuisance will disappear.

After all, this see-no-evil approach has worked terrifically, so far. When suicide bombers murdered Moustapha Akka, the producer of all eight "Halloween" horror films, in Amman, Jordan, the entire Hollywood community maintained serene silence. Hundreds had launched their careers and made a good living from his labors, but there was no point in paying public tribute to him, starting scholarships in his name or any of that boring stuff.  As for his gorgeous daughter Rima, 35, also murdered in the attack, whom so many had gone to school with at Beverly Hills High and USC, well, it really was a shame.  But it's hardly an outrage like Bill O'Reilly's latest remarks.

The American entertainment community's response to Islamic challenges was set in stone when Theo Van Gogh was knifed to death in the street for offending Muslim sensibilities with his film. Hollywood's collective shrug was heard around the world. No stirring speeches, no defiant editorials, not even a passing frame in the annual memoriam Oscar tribute.  No, Hollywood prefers to reserve that sacred honor for Leni Riefenstahl, Hitler's master propagandist.

Amidst the stunning challenges of our time, the entertainment community is cowering under the table.

Stella Paul blogs at StellaPundit