The Palin Money Machine

J.C. Arenas
A good portion of Sarah Palin's new-found multi-million dollar income has come from six-figure speaking engagements; and now her daughter Bristol, is poised to generate her own vast earnings in the same manner. An Associated Press report from earlier this week disclosed that she will command between $15,000 and $30,000 for each of her appearances.

While her mother's market value is unquestionable because she is an established and accomplished individual in the world of politics, it's difficult to ascertain how Bristol's market value was derived. At this point in her life, she simply does not have a resume comparable to her mother's, and it appears she is benefitting mostly from her last name and -- what many would see as -- unfortunate circumstances.

As a pregnant teenager, Bristol, like her mother, became a national figure during the 2008 presidential election; since then she has shared her personal challenges as a single, teenage mother and become an advocate for abstinence. But, the concept that her value for one speech is equivalent to the starting annual salary of a typical, new college graduate, escapes logic.

With that being said, with great money comes great responsibility.

If Bristol wants to be taken as a serious professional with a genuine message to share, she can't repeat her recent mistake of partying at an after-hours New York City night club, the same day she was celebrating the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

While the Palins should be commended for their success, especially after being undeservedly forced to suffer in the public eye from innumerable personal attacks, I fear that over time they will lose the appeal they once had to the average American.

Unfortunately, money often changes people and how they are perceived.

J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com
A good portion of Sarah Palin's new-found multi-million dollar income has come from six-figure speaking engagements; and now her daughter Bristol, is poised to generate her own vast earnings in the same manner. An Associated Press report from earlier this week disclosed that she will command between $15,000 and $30,000 for each of her appearances.

While her mother's market value is unquestionable because she is an established and accomplished individual in the world of politics, it's difficult to ascertain how Bristol's market value was derived. At this point in her life, she simply does not have a resume comparable to her mother's, and it appears she is benefitting mostly from her last name and -- what many would see as -- unfortunate circumstances.

As a pregnant teenager, Bristol, like her mother, became a national figure during the 2008 presidential election; since then she has shared her personal challenges as a single, teenage mother and become an advocate for abstinence. But, the concept that her value for one speech is equivalent to the starting annual salary of a typical, new college graduate, escapes logic.

With that being said, with great money comes great responsibility.

If Bristol wants to be taken as a serious professional with a genuine message to share, she can't repeat her recent mistake of partying at an after-hours New York City night club, the same day she was celebrating the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

While the Palins should be commended for their success, especially after being undeservedly forced to suffer in the public eye from innumerable personal attacks, I fear that over time they will lose the appeal they once had to the average American.

Unfortunately, money often changes people and how they are perceived.

J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com