Surfers subjected to racial profiling in Mexico

The objection that most native Mexicans have to the new Arizona law seems to be racial profiling. The idea that Americans could be required to provide documentation validating their right to be on American soil, is highly objectionable to some. Despite the fact that the procedure would only momentarily inconvenience them, they complain that it is completely unreasonable. Is it reasonable that for the many privilege's of living here we should all willingly be inconvenienced in order for our society as a whole to be safer and more civilized? The Mexican Government certainly thinks so. After several trips south of the border, I have come to expect racial profiling as a matter of course and the price to pay for exploring the wild and pristine coastal areas of Baja California. As a life long surfer, I share the universal desire for uncrowded, quality waves that can be found by driving the military patrolled highways of the mexican coast. Many long hours of preparation and packing go into these often multi- day trips. It is customary during these trips that several times a day we encounter the Federalies (with automatic weapons in hand). They set up makeshift checkpoints which involve the handing over of our papers, as well as the searching of our vehicles. Most of our carefully packed belongings usually end up ,well, less carefully packed. We recognize that the actions of some of the early surfers to visit Baja California have resulted in the police being suspicious of all of us.

While being subjected to a request for identification here in America is a hassle, it doesn't compare with the experience of white American males in Mexico. However, many of us continue to return because it's worth it.

In our modern world it seems inevitable that we will all be experiencing increased amounts of inconveniences in the interest of security. Despite that, I believe that people from around the world will continue to aspire to American citizenship. Why? Because it's worth it.


The objection that most native Mexicans have to the new Arizona law seems to be racial profiling. The idea that Americans could be required to provide documentation validating their right to be on American soil, is highly objectionable to some. Despite the fact that the procedure would only momentarily inconvenience them, they complain that it is completely unreasonable.

Is it reasonable that for the many privilege's of living here we should all willingly be inconvenienced in order for our society as a whole to be safer and more civilized? The Mexican Government certainly thinks so. After several trips south of the border, I have come to expect racial profiling as a matter of course and the price to pay for exploring the wild and pristine coastal areas of Baja California. As a life long surfer, I share the universal desire for uncrowded, quality waves that can be found by driving the military patrolled highways of the mexican coast. Many long hours of preparation and packing go into these often multi- day trips. It is customary during these trips that several times a day we encounter the Federalies (with automatic weapons in hand). They set up makeshift checkpoints which involve the handing over of our papers, as well as the searching of our vehicles. Most of our carefully packed belongings usually end up ,well, less carefully packed. We recognize that the actions of some of the early surfers to visit Baja California have resulted in the police being suspicious of all of us.

While being subjected to a request for identification here in America is a hassle, it doesn't compare with the experience of white American males in Mexico. However, many of us continue to return because it's worth it.

In our modern world it seems inevitable that we will all be experiencing increased amounts of inconveniences in the interest of security. Despite that, I believe that people from around the world will continue to aspire to American citizenship. Why? Because it's worth it.


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