Scott Brown shows his true colors

Ann Kane
Voting against Obamacare was Sen. Scott Brown's strategic way to gain the confidence and money of conservatives and independents in his special election bid last January, but that is where the similarity between him and the Republican Party ended.  He signed off on the Jobs bill in February with no apparent consternation about joining the Democrats, and yesterday, along with three other Republicans, voted for the Senate version of the financial reform bill slated to be passed next month

From Politico:

In January, he broke the Democrats' lock on the Senate.

On Thursday, he gave it back. 

Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) effectively became the 60th vote to cut off debate on Wall Street reform Thursday - a far cry from when Republicans were hailing him as the 41st GOP-er who was going to stand up to the Democrats' agenda. Brown also voted yes on final passage.

In April, Brown had appeared on CBS Face the Nation and talked about filibustering the bill along with Republicans, unless the Democrats made changes to it.  In my April 19 AT post on this same topic, I wrote how he was setting the stage for an inevitable conclusion:

Notice how Brown indicates, "unless Democrats make improvements to it."  Classified as a Republican in name only, Brown is showing his willingness to compromise with the likes of Tim Geithner, and thereby dashes any hopes that he will make good decisions for America in the future. 

The lesson to be learned from the feckless Scott Browns of either party is this:  Voters cannot consider viable anyone who goes along to get along; not in this political climate where leftist ideology has threatened to collapse the economic structure of the world's greatest nation.  Conservative American voters must vet politicians based on the candidate's willingness to buck the system in order to come to his or her own conclusions on the merits of a piece of legislation. 

2012 won't come fast enough for Massachusetts voters.

Voting against Obamacare was Sen. Scott Brown's strategic way to gain the confidence and money of conservatives and independents in his special election bid last January, but that is where the similarity between him and the Republican Party ended.  He signed off on the Jobs bill in February with no apparent consternation about joining the Democrats, and yesterday, along with three other Republicans, voted for the Senate version of the financial reform bill slated to be passed next month

From Politico:

In January, he broke the Democrats' lock on the Senate.

On Thursday, he gave it back. 

Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.) effectively became the 60th vote to cut off debate on Wall Street reform Thursday - a far cry from when Republicans were hailing him as the 41st GOP-er who was going to stand up to the Democrats' agenda. Brown also voted yes on final passage.

In April, Brown had appeared on CBS Face the Nation and talked about filibustering the bill along with Republicans, unless the Democrats made changes to it.  In my April 19 AT post on this same topic, I wrote how he was setting the stage for an inevitable conclusion:

Notice how Brown indicates, "unless Democrats make improvements to it."  Classified as a Republican in name only, Brown is showing his willingness to compromise with the likes of Tim Geithner, and thereby dashes any hopes that he will make good decisions for America in the future. 

The lesson to be learned from the feckless Scott Browns of either party is this:  Voters cannot consider viable anyone who goes along to get along; not in this political climate where leftist ideology has threatened to collapse the economic structure of the world's greatest nation.  Conservative American voters must vet politicians based on the candidate's willingness to buck the system in order to come to his or her own conclusions on the merits of a piece of legislation. 

2012 won't come fast enough for Massachusetts voters.