Mexican President Calderon in Washington to whine about immigration law

Rick Moran
We welcome our overlord from South of the Border - er, I mean South of what we used to think as the border but is not recognized as such even by our own government:

He has been frank in his condemnation of the Arizona law, however, saying it "opens the door to intolerance, hate, discrimination and abuse in law enforcement" and noting that the U.S. economy was built with a lot of Mexican sweat, legal and not.
In remarks to Spain's El Pais newspaper Friday, he asserted that the law is creating tensions between the two countries.

In Mexico, the political class from right to left has closed ranks to deplore the Arizona measure, which has dominated front pages and TV news here. Elected officials from the three major parties are exhorting Calderón to challenge it in Washington, where on Wednesday he will be greeted with pomp and ceremony at the White House and feted with high-end Mexican fusion food at a state dinner, and will address a joint session of Congress.

But the atmosphere might be a little strained.

[...]
The Mexican Embassy in Washington is preparing amicus briefs to support lawsuits by civil rights groups seeking repeal of the measure. The head of Mexico's National Human Rights Commission declared the law "xenophobic." Mexican universities said they would suspend student-exchange programs involving Arizona. And cartoonists here have had a field day depicting an Arizona without Mexicans, where U.S. citizens are forced to cook their own food, cut their lawns, pick their crops and care for their children.

I daresay that if Mexicans - illegal or otherwise - disappeared from America tomorrow, life would most assuredly go on and Americans who are unemployed would take most of those jobs if competitive wages would be offered. This can't happen when illegals are willing to work for less than minimum wage.

Note: The American worker is the most productive worker in the history of human civilization. Our productivity rate is far beyond any other industrialized country and continues to rise.

I don't think Mexican cartoonists get it, do you?


We welcome our overlord from South of the Border - er, I mean South of what we used to think as the border but is not recognized as such even by our own government:

He has been frank in his condemnation of the Arizona law, however, saying it "opens the door to intolerance, hate, discrimination and abuse in law enforcement" and noting that the U.S. economy was built with a lot of Mexican sweat, legal and not.
In remarks to Spain's El Pais newspaper Friday, he asserted that the law is creating tensions between the two countries.

In Mexico, the political class from right to left has closed ranks to deplore the Arizona measure, which has dominated front pages and TV news here. Elected officials from the three major parties are exhorting Calderón to challenge it in Washington, where on Wednesday he will be greeted with pomp and ceremony at the White House and feted with high-end Mexican fusion food at a state dinner, and will address a joint session of Congress.

But the atmosphere might be a little strained.

[...]
The Mexican Embassy in Washington is preparing amicus briefs to support lawsuits by civil rights groups seeking repeal of the measure. The head of Mexico's National Human Rights Commission declared the law "xenophobic." Mexican universities said they would suspend student-exchange programs involving Arizona. And cartoonists here have had a field day depicting an Arizona without Mexicans, where U.S. citizens are forced to cook their own food, cut their lawns, pick their crops and care for their children.

I daresay that if Mexicans - illegal or otherwise - disappeared from America tomorrow, life would most assuredly go on and Americans who are unemployed would take most of those jobs if competitive wages would be offered. This can't happen when illegals are willing to work for less than minimum wage.

Note: The American worker is the most productive worker in the history of human civilization. Our productivity rate is far beyond any other industrialized country and continues to rise.

I don't think Mexican cartoonists get it, do you?