Full of holes; the Times Square story

J.C. Arenas
Despite what the U.S. government and an unintuitive media would like for the American public to believe, the story surrounding Faisal Shahzad's attempt to bomb Times Square is full of holes and thus warrants many questions.

Yesterday, the Associated Press reported that following a dry run on April 28, Shahzad began to enact his plan on the 30th, when he drove to back to the area to leave his getaway car, a black Isuzu-MyFoxNY.com reported the Isuzu was left parked in an area somewhere on a street in the 30s between 8th and 9th Avenue.

Then on May 1st, the next day, he drove back into the city in the 1993 Nissan Pathfinder that was loaded with firecrackers, gasoline, and propane and left it at shortly before 6:30 P.M., a half-block from Shubert Alley, which is just west of Broadway between 44th and 45th street. Reportedly, sometime after leaving the Pathfinder to do its intended damage, Shahzad realized he left the key to the Isuzu-and the key to his home-in the ignition of the Pathfinder. Assumedly, he didn't realize this until he reached the Isuzu, because if he had done so beforehand, he wouldn't have walked the 10-20 minutes-depending on the location of the car-it would have taken him to reach it.

After he realized he couldn't use his getaway car, he was forced to use public transportation to get back to his home in Bridgeport, Connecticut-the aforementioned MyFoxNY.com report states that he took the Metro North from Grand Central Station to get home. So now we have Shahzad, leaving the black Isuzu and walking another 20 minutes to Grand Central terminal to catch the train to Bridgeport. That evening, the earliest train that he could have possibly caught would have departed at 7:07, but given our proposed timeline, he would have likely not made it in time for that train. That leaves two other possible departure times, 7:34 and 8:07 P.M..

On May 2nd, he returned to the black Isuzu with a second set of keys to the car-the MyFoxNY.com report explains that he was able to obtain a second set of keys by getting a locksmith to break into the car for him, and assumedly, make another key so he could drive it.

On May 3rd, he drives the retrieved Isuzu to JFK, and while in transit, books a flight for Dubai set to leave late that night. He's arrested at 11:45 P.M. after it was communicated to the pilot that he needed to return the plane to its gate after Shahzad was already on board.

Now that we have established the timeline of these events, let's ask some questions that the media should have.

Question #1:
How did he get back to Connecticut after leaving the Isuzu he used to get into the city on the 30th?

Questions #2, #3, and #4
: Where did he leave the car? It couldn't have just been abandoned on the street for more than 24 hours, it would have been towed. Was it parked at a lot? If so, where is the lot's record of the car being parked there?

Question #5:
Are there are any witnesses who can identify Shahzad because they saw him in the area on the 30th, after he abandoned the Isuzu, the 1st, after he abandoned the Pathfinder and walked to the Isuzu, after he walked from the Isuzu to Grand Central Terminal, while he was waiting for a train at the terminal, or while on the train back to Bridgeport?

Question #6:
How did Shahzad get home from the train station in Bridgeport?

Question #7:
How did Shahzad get into his apartment without his keys?

Question #8:
Where's the locksmith who helped him get into his car and made a new key for him to drive it?

Question #9:
Why in the world would Shahzad go back to the Isuzu when he could have taken other means of transportation to get to JFK?

Question #10:
Why did he wait over 48 hours after the bombing attempt to try to leave the country? Given that the bomb didn't work, he should have realized the Pathfinder could be traced back to him, the keys he reportedly left in the car could be traced back to his Isuzu and his apartment, and at the very least a locksmith-who he would have shown his driver's license, vehicle registration, and other information, in order to get his assistance- could have identified him.

The story the media is reporting seems to be coming from one source: Eric Holder's Justice Department. In this tale of events, a seemingly incredibly dumb criminal stars by his lonesome, and even though he's assumedly walking around Midtown-there are no accounts of him taking taxis and no cabbies claiming to be witnesses-and using public transportation in the city, possibly before and after the bombing attempt, there are no witnesses who have come forward to tie him to any of the events of the story being reported.

I'm in no way suggesting that Shahzad isn't involved in the crime he is accused of, I'm simply stating the current version of events is full of holes; and dumbfounded that certain questions haven't been asked and that certain information hasn't been verified.


J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com

Despite what the U.S. government and an unintuitive media would like for the American public to believe, the story surrounding Faisal Shahzad's attempt to bomb Times Square is full of holes and thus warrants many questions.

Yesterday, the Associated Press reported that following a dry run on April 28, Shahzad began to enact his plan on the 30th, when he drove to back to the area to leave his getaway car, a black Isuzu-MyFoxNY.com reported the Isuzu was left parked in an area somewhere on a street in the 30s between 8th and 9th Avenue.

Then on May 1st, the next day, he drove back into the city in the 1993 Nissan Pathfinder that was loaded with firecrackers, gasoline, and propane and left it at shortly before 6:30 P.M., a half-block from Shubert Alley, which is just west of Broadway between 44th and 45th street. Reportedly, sometime after leaving the Pathfinder to do its intended damage, Shahzad realized he left the key to the Isuzu-and the key to his home-in the ignition of the Pathfinder. Assumedly, he didn't realize this until he reached the Isuzu, because if he had done so beforehand, he wouldn't have walked the 10-20 minutes-depending on the location of the car-it would have taken him to reach it.

After he realized he couldn't use his getaway car, he was forced to use public transportation to get back to his home in Bridgeport, Connecticut-the aforementioned MyFoxNY.com report states that he took the Metro North from Grand Central Station to get home. So now we have Shahzad, leaving the black Isuzu and walking another 20 minutes to Grand Central terminal to catch the train to Bridgeport. That evening, the earliest train that he could have possibly caught would have departed at 7:07, but given our proposed timeline, he would have likely not made it in time for that train. That leaves two other possible departure times, 7:34 and 8:07 P.M..

On May 2nd, he returned to the black Isuzu with a second set of keys to the car-the MyFoxNY.com report explains that he was able to obtain a second set of keys by getting a locksmith to break into the car for him, and assumedly, make another key so he could drive it.

On May 3rd, he drives the retrieved Isuzu to JFK, and while in transit, books a flight for Dubai set to leave late that night. He's arrested at 11:45 P.M. after it was communicated to the pilot that he needed to return the plane to its gate after Shahzad was already on board.

Now that we have established the timeline of these events, let's ask some questions that the media should have.

Question #1:
How did he get back to Connecticut after leaving the Isuzu he used to get into the city on the 30th?

Questions #2, #3, and #4
: Where did he leave the car? It couldn't have just been abandoned on the street for more than 24 hours, it would have been towed. Was it parked at a lot? If so, where is the lot's record of the car being parked there?

Question #5:
Are there are any witnesses who can identify Shahzad because they saw him in the area on the 30th, after he abandoned the Isuzu, the 1st, after he abandoned the Pathfinder and walked to the Isuzu, after he walked from the Isuzu to Grand Central Terminal, while he was waiting for a train at the terminal, or while on the train back to Bridgeport?

Question #6:
How did Shahzad get home from the train station in Bridgeport?

Question #7:
How did Shahzad get into his apartment without his keys?

Question #8:
Where's the locksmith who helped him get into his car and made a new key for him to drive it?

Question #9:
Why in the world would Shahzad go back to the Isuzu when he could have taken other means of transportation to get to JFK?

Question #10:
Why did he wait over 48 hours after the bombing attempt to try to leave the country? Given that the bomb didn't work, he should have realized the Pathfinder could be traced back to him, the keys he reportedly left in the car could be traced back to his Isuzu and his apartment, and at the very least a locksmith-who he would have shown his driver's license, vehicle registration, and other information, in order to get his assistance- could have identified him.

The story the media is reporting seems to be coming from one source: Eric Holder's Justice Department. In this tale of events, a seemingly incredibly dumb criminal stars by his lonesome, and even though he's assumedly walking around Midtown-there are no accounts of him taking taxis and no cabbies claiming to be witnesses-and using public transportation in the city, possibly before and after the bombing attempt, there are no witnesses who have come forward to tie him to any of the events of the story being reported.

I'm in no way suggesting that Shahzad isn't involved in the crime he is accused of, I'm simply stating the current version of events is full of holes; and dumbfounded that certain questions haven't been asked and that certain information hasn't been verified.


J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com