Congress feels your pain - well, sort of

While a majority in Congress blithely spends your money, that doesn't mean they don't feel your pain. So they are bravely doing something about it --agreeing to a pay freeze.
Facing election-year pressure to keep a lid on their salaries, lawmakers in Congress have agreed quietly not to increase their pay next year. (snip) The Senate rejected the increase in a voice vote, and the House of Representatives concurred, 402 to 15. Even the small increase would have been hard to explain in the months before November's elections.
But don't cry for some of those in Congress.
While about 1 percent of Americans are considered millionaires, 44 percent of members of Congress were in that category. Fifty members had wealth topping $10 million.
As for the other 56% non millionaire members of Congress well, they still earn more than the average worker, have great benefits with fairly good job security; despite constant running for re-election, most incumbents win.

We should all be so lucky.





While a majority in Congress blithely spends your money, that doesn't mean they don't feel your pain. So they are bravely doing something about it --agreeing to a pay freeze.
Facing election-year pressure to keep a lid on their salaries, lawmakers in Congress have agreed quietly not to increase their pay next year. (snip) The Senate rejected the increase in a voice vote, and the House of Representatives concurred, 402 to 15. Even the small increase would have been hard to explain in the months before November's elections.
But don't cry for some of those in Congress.
While about 1 percent of Americans are considered millionaires, 44 percent of members of Congress were in that category. Fifty members had wealth topping $10 million.
As for the other 56% non millionaire members of Congress well, they still earn more than the average worker, have great benefits with fairly good job security; despite constant running for re-election, most incumbents win.

We should all be so lucky.





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