About that Sestak attempted bribe, White House says 'trust us!'

Or, as the LA Times Top of the Ticket blog puts it: "Obama White House probe of Obama White House finds no Obama White House impropriety on Sestak."

Peter Baker from the New York Times:

But the White House wants everyone who suspects that something untoward, or even illegal, might have happened to rest easy: though it still will not reveal what happened, the White House is reassuring skeptics that it has examined its own actions and decided it did nothing wrong. Whatever it was that it did.

"Lawyers in the White House and others have looked into conversations that were had with Congressman Sestak," Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said Sunday on "Face the Nation" on CBS. "And nothing inappropriate happened."

"Improper or not, did you offer him a job in the administration?" asked the host, Bob Schieffer.

"I'm not going to get further into what the conversations were," Mr. Gibbs replied. "People that have looked into them assure me that they weren't inappropriate in any way."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the "trust us" response from the White House has not exactly put the matter to rest. With Mr. Sestak's victory over Mr. Specter in last week's primary, the questions have returned with intensity, only to remain unanswered. Mr. Gibbs deflected questions 13 times at a White House briefing last week just two days after the primary. Mr. Sestak, a retired admiral, has reaffirmed his assertion without providing any details, like who exactly offered what job.

You will recall that this is exactly the same way the White House handled allegations about their role in the selling of Obama's senate seat that led to the impeachment of Rod Blagojevich. A "thorough" internal review by the White House was conducted and they, in effect, cleared themselves of wrongdoing.

Of course, at that time, the press was willing to go along with Obama. Will they today?

There doesn't appear to be any urgency from the media to get to the bottom of this story. This leads one to believe that any ideas we might have entertained that the press was falling out of love with the president were greatly exaggerated.


Or, as the LA Times Top of the Ticket blog puts it: "Obama White House probe of Obama White House finds no Obama White House impropriety on Sestak."

Peter Baker from the New York Times:

But the White House wants everyone who suspects that something untoward, or even illegal, might have happened to rest easy: though it still will not reveal what happened, the White House is reassuring skeptics that it has examined its own actions and decided it did nothing wrong. Whatever it was that it did.

"Lawyers in the White House and others have looked into conversations that were had with Congressman Sestak," Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said Sunday on "Face the Nation" on CBS. "And nothing inappropriate happened."

"Improper or not, did you offer him a job in the administration?" asked the host, Bob Schieffer.

"I'm not going to get further into what the conversations were," Mr. Gibbs replied. "People that have looked into them assure me that they weren't inappropriate in any way."

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the "trust us" response from the White House has not exactly put the matter to rest. With Mr. Sestak's victory over Mr. Specter in last week's primary, the questions have returned with intensity, only to remain unanswered. Mr. Gibbs deflected questions 13 times at a White House briefing last week just two days after the primary. Mr. Sestak, a retired admiral, has reaffirmed his assertion without providing any details, like who exactly offered what job.

You will recall that this is exactly the same way the White House handled allegations about their role in the selling of Obama's senate seat that led to the impeachment of Rod Blagojevich. A "thorough" internal review by the White House was conducted and they, in effect, cleared themselves of wrongdoing.

Of course, at that time, the press was willing to go along with Obama. Will they today?

There doesn't appear to be any urgency from the media to get to the bottom of this story. This leads one to believe that any ideas we might have entertained that the press was falling out of love with the president were greatly exaggerated.


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