Will America's youth wake up to the reality of Obama?

Rick Moran
America's youth went overwhelming for Barack Obama in the 2008 election. The question is, what will be their reaction when they realize what the president has saddled them with?

Michael Franc writing in the National Review:

Millenials remain largely in Obama's corner to this day, but their fervor is waning. Pew found that, over the course of 2009, Millennials grew increasingly disenchanted with both the president and his party. The president's approval rating among young voters fell from its post-inaugural high of 73 percent to 57 percent in February. The Democrats' partisan advantage among Millennials narrowed as well, moving from 60 percent-31 percent to 54 percent-40 percent over the last year. Their positive assessment of Obama's handling of health care and the economy over the last year tumbled even more dramatically, by 17 and 22 percentage points respectively.
And the first Gallup survey conducted after the new health-care law took effect found respectable, but less than overwhelming, support for Obama's signature legislative achievement among those between 18 and 34 years old. Little more than half (54 percent) viewed the new law as a "good thing." A significant minority (45 percent) dissented.

So, will younger voters come to resent all these new burdens Obama and his allies are placing on their shoulders? And, if so, will they make their views known in November's elections?

A new Rasmussen poll may have the answer:

Rasmussen's poll results suggest that the Millennials who plan to vote in November are a breed apart from the broader sample surveyed by Pew. In fact, they seem to possess the sort of ideological instincts that will facilitate a rightward shift in their political behavior. A close reading suggests that if the Millennium Generation is to move to the right, it will be because they have come to appreciate the unique intergenerational fiscal burden being foisted on them.

A couple of examples: Among Millennials who say they are very likely to vote, two-thirds believe spending and tax increases hurt the economy. Even higher proportions look kindly on tax and spending cuts, saying they will foster economic growth. Little wonder that, by a resounding 78 percent-17 percent margin, they prefer a government that provides fewer services and taxes us less to one that taxes us more and provides more services. Ask them to assess the merits of offshore drilling for oil and natural gas, and they turn out to be even more supportive than Americans in general. And so on.

Perhaps it is almost important that the disenchantment with Obama by Millenials will affect the electoral picture more because they will go back to being non-voters as much as there will be any fall off in support for Democrats. If that's the case, their impact will lessen dramatically and a combination of the two might even turn out to be a plus for Republicans.

 

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky

 



America's youth went overwhelming for Barack Obama in the 2008 election. The question is, what will be their reaction when they realize what the president has saddled them with?

Michael Franc writing in the National Review:

Millenials remain largely in Obama's corner to this day, but their fervor is waning. Pew found that, over the course of 2009, Millennials grew increasingly disenchanted with both the president and his party. The president's approval rating among young voters fell from its post-inaugural high of 73 percent to 57 percent in February. The Democrats' partisan advantage among Millennials narrowed as well, moving from 60 percent-31 percent to 54 percent-40 percent over the last year. Their positive assessment of Obama's handling of health care and the economy over the last year tumbled even more dramatically, by 17 and 22 percentage points respectively.


And the first Gallup survey conducted after the new health-care law took effect found respectable, but less than overwhelming, support for Obama's signature legislative achievement among those between 18 and 34 years old. Little more than half (54 percent) viewed the new law as a "good thing." A significant minority (45 percent) dissented.

So, will younger voters come to resent all these new burdens Obama and his allies are placing on their shoulders? And, if so, will they make their views known in November's elections?

A new Rasmussen poll may have the answer:

Rasmussen's poll results suggest that the Millennials who plan to vote in November are a breed apart from the broader sample surveyed by Pew. In fact, they seem to possess the sort of ideological instincts that will facilitate a rightward shift in their political behavior. A close reading suggests that if the Millennium Generation is to move to the right, it will be because they have come to appreciate the unique intergenerational fiscal burden being foisted on them.

A couple of examples: Among Millennials who say they are very likely to vote, two-thirds believe spending and tax increases hurt the economy. Even higher proportions look kindly on tax and spending cuts, saying they will foster economic growth. Little wonder that, by a resounding 78 percent-17 percent margin, they prefer a government that provides fewer services and taxes us less to one that taxes us more and provides more services. Ask them to assess the merits of offshore drilling for oil and natural gas, and they turn out to be even more supportive than Americans in general. And so on.

Perhaps it is almost important that the disenchantment with Obama by Millenials will affect the electoral picture more because they will go back to being non-voters as much as there will be any fall off in support for Democrats. If that's the case, their impact will lessen dramatically and a combination of the two might even turn out to be a plus for Republicans.

 

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky