Ron Paul, Obama even in polls.

Monty Pelerin
The mood of the people in the US is clearly changing. Whether the turn reflects itself in governmental policies or not is moot. If it does not, then this country is in for social and political unrest, perhaps to an extent not seen since the 1860s.

An indication of the mood swing is demonstrated by the fact that Ron Paul now polls even with Barack Obama. These two men have vastly different visions of the role of government, so different that they are incompatible with each other. This polling data and the continued rise in the popularity of the Tea Party movement suggests a growing schism that cannot easily coexist with President Obama's vision of America.

It is unlikely that Ron Paul is a viable candidate for the highest office in the land primarily because of age, but also because some of his libertarian positions are still considered radical by the populace. His popularity is more symbolic and owes to his core positions rather than his persona. These positions, embraced by a younger, more dynamic figure, would produce a real choice most Americans have yearned for.

Whether some politician can step in as the "new Ron Paul" is not known. Yet the tension between the old Barack Obama and the old Ron Paul defines the schism in US politics. It would be hoped that a candidate would be found for 2012 that represents the growing discontent with the direction of the country. That would provide a true referendum on the two competing visions. Better that the verdict is determined at the ballot box rather than other means.   

The Washington Examiner (via AP) and published in the Daily Bell describes the Paul popularity by writing, "But there's no doubt that hating the government and the powerful interests that pull Washington's strings has gone from the radical precincts of the Right and Left to the mainstream."


Monty Pelerin at www.economicnoise.com montypelerin@gmail.com

 


The mood of the people in the US is clearly changing. Whether the turn reflects itself in governmental policies or not is moot. If it does not, then this country is in for social and political unrest, perhaps to an extent not seen since the 1860s.

An indication of the mood swing is demonstrated by the fact that Ron Paul now polls even with Barack Obama. These two men have vastly different visions of the role of government, so different that they are incompatible with each other. This polling data and the continued rise in the popularity of the Tea Party movement suggests a growing schism that cannot easily coexist with President Obama's vision of America.

It is unlikely that Ron Paul is a viable candidate for the highest office in the land primarily because of age, but also because some of his libertarian positions are still considered radical by the populace. His popularity is more symbolic and owes to his core positions rather than his persona. These positions, embraced by a younger, more dynamic figure, would produce a real choice most Americans have yearned for.

Whether some politician can step in as the "new Ron Paul" is not known. Yet the tension between the old Barack Obama and the old Ron Paul defines the schism in US politics. It would be hoped that a candidate would be found for 2012 that represents the growing discontent with the direction of the country. That would provide a true referendum on the two competing visions. Better that the verdict is determined at the ballot box rather than other means.   

The Washington Examiner (via AP) and published in the Daily Bell describes the Paul popularity by writing, "But there's no doubt that hating the government and the powerful interests that pull Washington's strings has gone from the radical precincts of the Right and Left to the mainstream."


Monty Pelerin at www.economicnoise.com montypelerin@gmail.com