New conservative 527 group has raised $30 million

Clarice Feldman
If you are unhappy with the Republican National Committee and still wish to find a way to support Republican candidates,there is a new organization to which you might contribute; American Crossroads.

Like New Ledger's Pejman Yousefzadeh I supported Michael Steele's candidacy for head of the RNC and now regret it as he has consistently failed to meet my expectations. If the Republicans are to take back the federal government it must be by proving their willingness to be fiscally responsible and the wasteful spending of the RNC under Steele is no way to send that message.

The Washington Examiner, citing Brody Mullins , describes the orgnaizers of American Crossroads
"The new American Crossroads organization will be run by former RNC Chairman Mike Duncan and Joanne Davidson, a onetime RNC co-chair. Former RNC Chairman Ed Gillespie and former White House adviser Karl Rove are informally advising the organization.

The day-to-day operations will be handled by Steven Law, who is leaving a top role at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Republican consultant Jim Dyke will also be involved."

Peter Stone at the National Journal has even more details on the group

So far, the new soft-money group, American Crossroads, has received commitments of almost $30 million and is seeking to raise a total of some $60 million to help dozens of Senate and House incumbents and challengers this fall, say three sources familiar with the new 527. In contrast, at the start of January, the Republican National Committee had only $8.4 million in the bank compared with the $22.8 million it had on had a year earlier when Steele was elected chairman.


Steven J. Law, the general counsel at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and one time executive director of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, is expected late next week to take over as president and chief executive officer of the 527. American Crossroads is now assembling a board of directors that's likely to include some big donors and a few GOP luminaries.



Clarice Feldman


If you are unhappy with the Republican National Committee and still wish to find a way to support Republican candidates,there is a new organization to which you might contribute; American Crossroads.

Like New Ledger's Pejman Yousefzadeh I supported Michael Steele's candidacy for head of the RNC and now regret it as he has consistently failed to meet my expectations. If the Republicans are to take back the federal government it must be by proving their willingness to be fiscally responsible and the wasteful spending of the RNC under Steele is no way to send that message.

The Washington Examiner, citing Brody Mullins , describes the orgnaizers of American Crossroads
"The new American Crossroads organization will be run by former RNC Chairman Mike Duncan and Joanne Davidson, a onetime RNC co-chair. Former RNC Chairman Ed Gillespie and former White House adviser Karl Rove are informally advising the organization.

The day-to-day operations will be handled by Steven Law, who is leaving a top role at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Republican consultant Jim Dyke will also be involved."

Peter Stone at the National Journal has even more details on the group

So far, the new soft-money group, American Crossroads, has received commitments of almost $30 million and is seeking to raise a total of some $60 million to help dozens of Senate and House incumbents and challengers this fall, say three sources familiar with the new 527. In contrast, at the start of January, the Republican National Committee had only $8.4 million in the bank compared with the $22.8 million it had on had a year earlier when Steele was elected chairman.


Steven J. Law, the general counsel at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and one time executive director of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, is expected late next week to take over as president and chief executive officer of the 527. American Crossroads is now assembling a board of directors that's likely to include some big donors and a few GOP luminaries.



Clarice Feldman