It's just not cricket

Clarice Feldman
EU Referendum reports that because of an EU directive on the treatment of willow used in making cricket bats, UK companies producing them will soon go out of business, leaving the world with only a two year supply of the bats.

The dead hand of the EU has struck again, this time affecting Anglian Willow Services, based in King Street, High Ongar
It has been producing wood for cricket bats since the late 1700s, but now faces closure following the introduction of a Directive enforced on the UK in March, which bans use of the insecticide, methyl bromide.

The chemical, which has been banned "because of its effect on the environment", is necessary for the treatment of willow before it can be exported to India and made into cricket bats

The ban threatens the £3m-a-year Essex-based world cricket bat industry, as well as putting the future of the Watling family business in jeopardy. Val Watling, company secretary for Anglian Willow Services, says: "I am horrified by the whole thing. It's not just going to affect us, it will mean closure for any of the businesses that are involved in the exportation of willow for cricket bats."


Clarice Feldman


EU Referendum reports that because of an EU directive on the treatment of willow used in making cricket bats, UK companies producing them will soon go out of business, leaving the world with only a two year supply of the bats.

The dead hand of the EU has struck again, this time affecting Anglian Willow Services, based in King Street, High Ongar

It has been producing wood for cricket bats since the late 1700s, but now faces closure following the introduction of a Directive enforced on the UK in March, which bans use of the insecticide, methyl bromide.

The chemical, which has been banned "because of its effect on the environment", is necessary for the treatment of willow before it can be exported to India and made into cricket bats

The ban threatens the £3m-a-year Essex-based world cricket bat industry, as well as putting the future of the Watling family business in jeopardy. Val Watling, company secretary for Anglian Willow Services, says: "I am horrified by the whole thing. It's not just going to affect us, it will mean closure for any of the businesses that are involved in the exportation of willow for cricket bats."


Clarice Feldman