America's surrender of space

One of my most vivid memories from childhood is my father walking me to a hilltop at night and searching for the lights of Sputnik.  My father, a scientist and patriotic new immigrant, immediately realized the importance of the Soviets' penetration of space.  "That's where the future will be won," he told me, pointing to the star-flecked sky.  "And America better get up there and win it."

America's subsequent triumph in space, as the first and only nation to land men on the moon and safely return them, is the greatest achievement of the 20th century. So it makes perverted sense for Obama to destroy our pride in this matchless accomplishment and stage our humiliation before the world. America, which once deployed masterly innovation, commitment and daring to vanquish the Soviets in space, is now deliberately stranding seven astronauts in orbit with no way home except to hitch a ride from the Russians. We've surrendered the New Frontier.

The symbolism is breathtaking. From now on, whenever we remember with pride the courage and sacrifice of the Mercury astronauts, or Neil Armstrong taking "One small step for a man, one giant step for mankind," or Jim Lovell and the crew of Apollo 13 calmly tinkering with duct tape to repair their capsule, we'll quickly deflate with the afterthought: "Oh yeah. Now the Russians do that. We don't."  There will always be a punchline, an asterisk, an anti-climactic stain at the end of the story.

And that's really the point, isn't it? Obama has pulled America's big dreams back to earth.  No more of that once ubiquitous cliché, "Surely, if we can go to the moon, we can do X." We can't go to the moon. Or Mars. Or even into space.  President Kennedy, who launched the space program, told us, "We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard."

America doesn't do hard anymore.  There's no point in inspiring our children with dreams of being an astronaut and reaching for the stars. We're more "nuanced" now. We understand there's only one path to greatness in the 21st century, only one way upward to the stars: through Obama.

The eternal flame on Kennedy's grave is sputtering out, and America is lost in the dark.

Stella Paul writes at StellaPundit (StellaPundit.blogspot.com).

One of my most vivid memories from childhood is my father walking me to a hilltop at night and searching for the lights of Sputnik.  My father, a scientist and patriotic new immigrant, immediately realized the importance of the Soviets' penetration of space.  "That's where the future will be won," he told me, pointing to the star-flecked sky.  "And America better get up there and win it."

America's subsequent triumph in space, as the first and only nation to land men on the moon and safely return them, is the greatest achievement of the 20th century. So it makes perverted sense for Obama to destroy our pride in this matchless accomplishment and stage our humiliation before the world. America, which once deployed masterly innovation, commitment and daring to vanquish the Soviets in space, is now deliberately stranding seven astronauts in orbit with no way home except to hitch a ride from the Russians. We've surrendered the New Frontier.

The symbolism is breathtaking. From now on, whenever we remember with pride the courage and sacrifice of the Mercury astronauts, or Neil Armstrong taking "One small step for a man, one giant step for mankind," or Jim Lovell and the crew of Apollo 13 calmly tinkering with duct tape to repair their capsule, we'll quickly deflate with the afterthought: "Oh yeah. Now the Russians do that. We don't."  There will always be a punchline, an asterisk, an anti-climactic stain at the end of the story.

And that's really the point, isn't it? Obama has pulled America's big dreams back to earth.  No more of that once ubiquitous cliché, "Surely, if we can go to the moon, we can do X." We can't go to the moon. Or Mars. Or even into space.  President Kennedy, who launched the space program, told us, "We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard."

America doesn't do hard anymore.  There's no point in inspiring our children with dreams of being an astronaut and reaching for the stars. We're more "nuanced" now. We understand there's only one path to greatness in the 21st century, only one way upward to the stars: through Obama.

The eternal flame on Kennedy's grave is sputtering out, and America is lost in the dark.

Stella Paul writes at StellaPundit (StellaPundit.blogspot.com).

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