A conservative challenger in Michigan to a GOP congressman

Of the various tea party rallies today, there is at least one that portends good things for conservative constitutionalism.

That happening is in Kalamazoo, where a man named Jack Hoogendyk is announcing his candidacy to challenge Rep. Fred Upton (R) in this year's Republican primary for a seat in the U.S. House.


Upton has been a member of the House of Representatives since 1987. A quick glance at his record of late makes him the walking embodiment of everything that is wrong with long-serving politicians regardless of party affiliation. Upton voted for the Obama omnibus spending bill. He has supported legislation handing over more power to the federal government in health care, the automobile industry, and education. Upton often brags about his willingness to work with Democrats. What is useful about politely handing a match to Nancy Pelosi as she heads for the National Archives? This sort of Potomac Fever is cured only by permanent quarantine outside the District of Columbia.


Hoogendyk was approached by several constituents of Upton's district who are tired of Upton's "bipartisan" approach and wish to have a constitutional conservative in place as their representative. They could not have chosen a better figure to make this run against entrenched Washington power.


Hoogendyk served three terms as a state representative in Lansing, where he recorded a perfect record of pro-life voting. He is a conservative and legislated as one. Hoogendyk scrutinzes legislation and examines whether a bill expands government or expands liberty. Prior to each of the votes he cast in Lansing, he first asked himself whether the measure up for a vote was constitutional. Imagine that.


Sure, Hoogendyk's race is just one race. But it is a great start. The message is being sent and attention must be paid. One by one, seat by seat, we can place government back in the hands of the people. Party affiliation is immaterial. If you do not uphold your oath to protect and defend the Constitution, you are going out.


Matthew May welcomes comments at matthewtmay@yahoo.com

Of the various tea party rallies today, there is at least one that portends good things for conservative constitutionalism.

That happening is in Kalamazoo, where a man named Jack Hoogendyk is announcing his candidacy to challenge Rep. Fred Upton (R) in this year's Republican primary for a seat in the U.S. House.


Upton has been a member of the House of Representatives since 1987. A quick glance at his record of late makes him the walking embodiment of everything that is wrong with long-serving politicians regardless of party affiliation. Upton voted for the Obama omnibus spending bill. He has supported legislation handing over more power to the federal government in health care, the automobile industry, and education. Upton often brags about his willingness to work with Democrats. What is useful about politely handing a match to Nancy Pelosi as she heads for the National Archives? This sort of Potomac Fever is cured only by permanent quarantine outside the District of Columbia.


Hoogendyk was approached by several constituents of Upton's district who are tired of Upton's "bipartisan" approach and wish to have a constitutional conservative in place as their representative. They could not have chosen a better figure to make this run against entrenched Washington power.


Hoogendyk served three terms as a state representative in Lansing, where he recorded a perfect record of pro-life voting. He is a conservative and legislated as one. Hoogendyk scrutinzes legislation and examines whether a bill expands government or expands liberty. Prior to each of the votes he cast in Lansing, he first asked himself whether the measure up for a vote was constitutional. Imagine that.


Sure, Hoogendyk's race is just one race. But it is a great start. The message is being sent and attention must be paid. One by one, seat by seat, we can place government back in the hands of the people. Party affiliation is immaterial. If you do not uphold your oath to protect and defend the Constitution, you are going out.


Matthew May welcomes comments at matthewtmay@yahoo.com

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