Youth today despairing of their future job prospects

Ann Kane
Social leftists always further their agenda by appealing to the youth.  Obama recruited college age students en masse to tip the scales in his favor during the election.  He attracted them through social justice rhetoric when he spoke of public service and volunteerism.  Obama promised the millennials the world, but he had no intention of delivering.

Whether the 18-29 year olds who still have faith in the president will wake up, and see that he sold them out in favor of a selfish agenda where progressive elitists grab money and power while the rest of the country goes deeper into debt, remains to be seen.   For now, though, the Harvard Institute of Politics gives us a snapshot of the way the young adult population feels about the world around them.

An excerpt from the Iowa Gazette Online regarding the new poll:

Given the state of the economy, nearly half of college students today question their ability to stay in school.  Almost half of all four-year undergraduates (45 percent) and nearly two-thirds of community college students (64 percent) are concerned about staying in college.  When four-year college students were asked how easy or difficult it would be for members of their class to find jobs after graduation, only 14 percent said it would be "easy" but more than eight in ten (84 percent) indicated it would be "difficult."  Two years ago in the spring of 2008, when this question was asked by our different polling partner, 30 percent of college students said it would be "easy" to find a job; in 2006, 37 percent and in 2004 31 percent said the same.

Majority of 18-29 year-olds still approve of President Obama's job performance generally, but continue to disapprove of his handling of major issues.

Unlike seasoned old-timers who have been kicked around long enough to withstand pangs of despair when times are tough, the youth who can't find a job after racking up debt from college will not be able to handle the discouragement.  Young people's sense of passion and drive to "change the world" diminishes whenever they see no hope on the horizon. 

On the other hand, this latest poll gives us hope that at least the Republican/conservative youth may take the reins and usher in the kind of reform America can be proud of.

Among 18-29 year-olds surveyed, young Republicans are showing more enthusiasm than young Democrats for participating in the upcoming midterm elections and are statistically more likely than Democrats to say they will "definitely be voting in November."  More than two-in-five (41 percent) Republicans are planning on voting, compared to 35 percent of Democrats and 13 percent of Independents. 

Social leftists always further their agenda by appealing to the youth.  Obama recruited college age students en masse to tip the scales in his favor during the election.  He attracted them through social justice rhetoric when he spoke of public service and volunteerism.  Obama promised the millennials the world, but he had no intention of delivering.

Whether the 18-29 year olds who still have faith in the president will wake up, and see that he sold them out in favor of a selfish agenda where progressive elitists grab money and power while the rest of the country goes deeper into debt, remains to be seen.   For now, though, the Harvard Institute of Politics gives us a snapshot of the way the young adult population feels about the world around them.

An excerpt from the Iowa Gazette Online regarding the new poll:

Given the state of the economy, nearly half of college students today question their ability to stay in school.  Almost half of all four-year undergraduates (45 percent) and nearly two-thirds of community college students (64 percent) are concerned about staying in college.  When four-year college students were asked how easy or difficult it would be for members of their class to find jobs after graduation, only 14 percent said it would be "easy" but more than eight in ten (84 percent) indicated it would be "difficult."  Two years ago in the spring of 2008, when this question was asked by our different polling partner, 30 percent of college students said it would be "easy" to find a job; in 2006, 37 percent and in 2004 31 percent said the same.

Majority of 18-29 year-olds still approve of President Obama's job performance generally, but continue to disapprove of his handling of major issues.

Unlike seasoned old-timers who have been kicked around long enough to withstand pangs of despair when times are tough, the youth who can't find a job after racking up debt from college will not be able to handle the discouragement.  Young people's sense of passion and drive to "change the world" diminishes whenever they see no hope on the horizon. 

On the other hand, this latest poll gives us hope that at least the Republican/conservative youth may take the reins and usher in the kind of reform America can be proud of.

Among 18-29 year-olds surveyed, young Republicans are showing more enthusiasm than young Democrats for participating in the upcoming midterm elections and are statistically more likely than Democrats to say they will "definitely be voting in November."  More than two-in-five (41 percent) Republicans are planning on voting, compared to 35 percent of Democrats and 13 percent of Independents.