Save the planet: raise the gas tax to $7 a gallon

John Peeples
"[A]ccording to a forthcoming report by researchers at Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs," as reported by the New York Times the intellectual commandants of the Ivy League have determined:
To meet the Obama administration's targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions, some researchers say, Americans may have to experience a sobering reality: gas at $7 a gallon.

To reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector 14 percent from 2005 levels by 2020, the cost of driving must simply increase.
This particular section of the Gray Lady is subtitled, "Nine billion People. One Planet."  According to Wikipedia, the world's population stands today at about 6.7 billion people, and is forecast to hit 9 billion folks roughly forty years from now.  As the story says, we can't afford to have that many people driving: "Researchers said that vehicle miles traveled will increase by more than 30 percent between 2010 and 2030 unless policymakers increase fuel taxes."

Again according to Wikipedia, the earth's population in 1800 totaled a little less than 1 billion people.  During the last two hundred years, man's quality of life endured a downward spiral that was inversely proportional to the horrific 700% population growth.  To illustrate the horror, here are some examples of how average life expectancies from 1800 compare with 2007: Brazil 32/72; China 32/73; Egypt 33/71; France 29/81 (recovering nicely from Napoleon's little revolution, thank you); India 25/65; Iran 25/71; Kenya 33/54; Russia 32/65; UK 40/79; US 39/78. 

Oops, maybe things have actually gotten better with unrestrained industrialization and unrepentant carbon flatulence.  But, back to the new taxes.

Assuming that vehicle emissions pose a lethal threat to humankind's existence, why not be honest and direct about solving the problem?  Gasoline rationing during WWII was very effective in limiting vehicle use.  Or, how about installing a GPS monitor on every car to ensure that no one exceeds a "travel allowance?"  Heck, if the problem is as bad as the green whackos claim, why not outlaw private automobiles altogether? 

Instead, Harvard and the New York Times declare that we must levy a tax.  Wow, what a shock.

John Peeples

   

"[A]ccording to a forthcoming report by researchers at Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs," as reported by the New York Times the intellectual commandants of the Ivy League have determined:
To meet the Obama administration's targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions, some researchers say, Americans may have to experience a sobering reality: gas at $7 a gallon.

To reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector 14 percent from 2005 levels by 2020, the cost of driving must simply increase.
This particular section of the Gray Lady is subtitled, "Nine billion People. One Planet."  According to Wikipedia, the world's population stands today at about 6.7 billion people, and is forecast to hit 9 billion folks roughly forty years from now.  As the story says, we can't afford to have that many people driving: "Researchers said that vehicle miles traveled will increase by more than 30 percent between 2010 and 2030 unless policymakers increase fuel taxes."

Again according to Wikipedia, the earth's population in 1800 totaled a little less than 1 billion people.  During the last two hundred years, man's quality of life endured a downward spiral that was inversely proportional to the horrific 700% population growth.  To illustrate the horror, here are some examples of how average life expectancies from 1800 compare with 2007: Brazil 32/72; China 32/73; Egypt 33/71; France 29/81 (recovering nicely from Napoleon's little revolution, thank you); India 25/65; Iran 25/71; Kenya 33/54; Russia 32/65; UK 40/79; US 39/78. 

Oops, maybe things have actually gotten better with unrestrained industrialization and unrepentant carbon flatulence.  But, back to the new taxes.

Assuming that vehicle emissions pose a lethal threat to humankind's existence, why not be honest and direct about solving the problem?  Gasoline rationing during WWII was very effective in limiting vehicle use.  Or, how about installing a GPS monitor on every car to ensure that no one exceeds a "travel allowance?"  Heck, if the problem is as bad as the green whackos claim, why not outlaw private automobiles altogether? 

Instead, Harvard and the New York Times declare that we must levy a tax.  Wow, what a shock.

John Peeples