Not bad for government work (Part II)

Rick Moran
Government employees at all levels are getting richer and more numerous since 1996, according to a BLS report quoted in the Wall Street Journal:

It turns out there really is growing inequality in America. It's the 45% premium in pay and benefits that government workers receive over the poor saps who create wealth in the private economy.
And the gap is growing. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), from 1998 to 2008 public employee compensation grew by 28.6%, compared with 19.3% for private workers. In the recession year of 2009, with almost no inflation and record budget deficits, more than half the states awarded pay raises to their employees. Even as deficits in state capitals widen and are forcing cuts in services, few politicians are willing to eliminate these pay inequities that enrich the few who wield political power.

Let's walk through the math. In 2008 almost half of all state and local government expenditures, or an estimated $1.1 trillion, went toward the pay and benefits of public workers. According to the BLS, in 2009 the average state or local public employee received $39.66 in total compensation per hour versus $27.42 for private workers. This means that for every $1 in pay and benefits a private employee earned, a state or local government worker received $1.45.
The BLS study breaks down where that 45% premium comes from. It turns out that public employees earn salaries that are about one-third higher on average than what is provided to private workers per hour worked. But the real windfall for government workers is in benefits. Those are 70% higher than what standard private employers offer...

We welcome our new public employee overlords.

Some states, the growth in government employees has been beyond belief. California has nearly doubled the number of government workers just in this decade. A vicious circle is created where powerful public unions dispense campaign contributions to politicians who then vote money to hire more union employees, whose dues fund even more political contributions to politicians. It is a cycle without end and has bankrupted several states.

The rules have to change or all of us will end up working for government some day.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



Government employees at all levels are getting richer and more numerous since 1996, according to a BLS report quoted in the Wall Street Journal:

It turns out there really is growing inequality in America. It's the 45% premium in pay and benefits that government workers receive over the poor saps who create wealth in the private economy.
And the gap is growing. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), from 1998 to 2008 public employee compensation grew by 28.6%, compared with 19.3% for private workers. In the recession year of 2009, with almost no inflation and record budget deficits, more than half the states awarded pay raises to their employees. Even as deficits in state capitals widen and are forcing cuts in services, few politicians are willing to eliminate these pay inequities that enrich the few who wield political power.

Let's walk through the math. In 2008 almost half of all state and local government expenditures, or an estimated $1.1 trillion, went toward the pay and benefits of public workers. According to the BLS, in 2009 the average state or local public employee received $39.66 in total compensation per hour versus $27.42 for private workers. This means that for every $1 in pay and benefits a private employee earned, a state or local government worker received $1.45.
The BLS study breaks down where that 45% premium comes from. It turns out that public employees earn salaries that are about one-third higher on average than what is provided to private workers per hour worked. But the real windfall for government workers is in benefits. Those are 70% higher than what standard private employers offer...

We welcome our new public employee overlords.

Some states, the growth in government employees has been beyond belief. California has nearly doubled the number of government workers just in this decade. A vicious circle is created where powerful public unions dispense campaign contributions to politicians who then vote money to hire more union employees, whose dues fund even more political contributions to politicians. It is a cycle without end and has bankrupted several states.

The rules have to change or all of us will end up working for government some day.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky