Money for wind farms but not for military families

You would think in a $600 billion military appropriation and a federal budget of more than $3 trillion,  a paltry billion dollars could be found to help the spouses and families of our soldiers with expenses for education.

In fact, the military has such a program - the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts program, known as MyCAA. But even though there appears to be plenty in the budget for green schemes, payoffs to political allies, and bailing out underwater homeowners, DoD has abruptly cut off funds to those already receiving MyCAA funds as well as preventing new participants from taking advantage of the grants:

The Pentagon was overwhelmed by the number of applicants, which had grown from an average of about 10,000 a month to 70,000 in January alone as the nation's economy continued to sputter. Money for the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts program, known as MyCAA, was rapidly running out. Rather than ask Congress for more cash, Pentagon officials decided to close the program to new applicants and stop payments to those who were already enrolled."This was probably, in my view, a mistake," Defense Secretary Robert Gates told the Senate Appropriations Committee's defense subcommittee last week, adding that while he expected the program to resume, it eventually could end up costing $1 billion to $2 billion.

It's all about priorities; and the Obama administration's inability to set them.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



You would think in a $600 billion military appropriation and a federal budget of more than $3 trillion,  a paltry billion dollars could be found to help the spouses and families of our soldiers with expenses for education.

In fact, the military has such a program - the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts program, known as MyCAA. But even though there appears to be plenty in the budget for green schemes, payoffs to political allies, and bailing out underwater homeowners, DoD has abruptly cut off funds to those already receiving MyCAA funds as well as preventing new participants from taking advantage of the grants:

The Pentagon was overwhelmed by the number of applicants, which had grown from an average of about 10,000 a month to 70,000 in January alone as the nation's economy continued to sputter. Money for the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts program, known as MyCAA, was rapidly running out. Rather than ask Congress for more cash, Pentagon officials decided to close the program to new applicants and stop payments to those who were already enrolled.

"This was probably, in my view, a mistake," Defense Secretary Robert Gates told the Senate Appropriations Committee's defense subcommittee last week, adding that while he expected the program to resume, it eventually could end up costing $1 billion to $2 billion.

It's all about priorities; and the Obama administration's inability to set them.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



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