Fauxmentum and the latest swing district polls

Clarice Feldman
Just One Minute's Tom Maguire sniffs an air of fauxmentum in the Democrat camp and Tom Bowler brings to our attention this swing district poll which should be giving a lot of Nancy's troops heartburn:

The Wall Street Journal has a very timely article about some swing district polling results about to be released by Independent Women's Voice.

The survey consisted of 1,200 registered voters in 35 districts represented by members who could determine the outcome of the health-care debate. Twenty of those members voted for the House bill in November but now may be reconsidering. Fifteen voted against the bill but are under tremendous pressure to change their vote.

The survey shows astonishing intensity and sharp opposition to reform, far more than national polls reflect. For 82% of those surveyed, the heath-care bill is either the top or one of the top three issues for deciding whom to support for Congress next November. (That number goes to 88% among independent women.) Sixty percent want Congress to start from scratch on a bipartisan health-care reform proposal or stop working on it this year. Majorities say the legislation will make them and their loved ones (53%), the economy (54%) and the U.S. health-care system (55%) worse off-quite the trifecta.

That ought to give those swing district reps something to ponder. I especially like the part about the "astonishing intensity."
Clarice Feldman
Just One Minute's Tom Maguire sniffs an air of fauxmentum in the Democrat camp and Tom Bowler brings to our attention this swing district poll which should be giving a lot of Nancy's troops heartburn:

The Wall Street Journal has a very timely article about some swing district polling results about to be released by Independent Women's Voice.

The survey consisted of 1,200 registered voters in 35 districts represented by members who could determine the outcome of the health-care debate. Twenty of those members voted for the House bill in November but now may be reconsidering. Fifteen voted against the bill but are under tremendous pressure to change their vote.

The survey shows astonishing intensity and sharp opposition to reform, far more than national polls reflect. For 82% of those surveyed, the heath-care bill is either the top or one of the top three issues for deciding whom to support for Congress next November. (That number goes to 88% among independent women.) Sixty percent want Congress to start from scratch on a bipartisan health-care reform proposal or stop working on it this year. Majorities say the legislation will make them and their loved ones (53%), the economy (54%) and the U.S. health-care system (55%) worse off-quite the trifecta.

That ought to give those swing district reps something to ponder. I especially like the part about the "astonishing intensity."
Clarice Feldman