CO2 emissions: Push coming to shove

In an effort to force the opposition to cave on the feckless Cap & Trade legislation, the administration, through the EPA, threatened to control CO2 emissions by regulations.Congress --mostly Republicans but Democrats in coal states as well--are now fighting back:
As Marin Cogan reports in Politico;

House Republicans are pushing a resolution that would block the EPA's regulation of greenhouse gases, throwing a wrench in the Obama administration's attempts to bypass Congress and regulate carbon emissions.

The announcement comes as a growing chorus of lawmakers-mostly Republicans, but some coal state Democrats as well- have criticized the EPA's decision to move forward on carbon regulations. Last year, the EPA issued a finding that the heat-trapping gases were harmful to the public, paving way for regulation under the Clean Air Act. Republicans say they're concerned the regulations will hurt the economy.

"The last thing we need in this economy is new jobs that amount to a new tax on energy," said Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio). "This really amounts to an attack on the private sector."

As the article notes, the President could simply veto such legislation if it were enacted, but it would certainly not sit well in the coal states; for example, West Virginia , with its two Democratic Senators .


Clarice Feldman


In an effort to force the opposition to cave on the feckless Cap & Trade legislation, the administration, through the EPA, threatened to control CO2 emissions by regulations.

Congress --mostly Republicans but Democrats in coal states as well--are now fighting back:
As Marin Cogan reports in Politico;

House Republicans are pushing a resolution that would block the EPA's regulation of greenhouse gases, throwing a wrench in the Obama administration's attempts to bypass Congress and regulate carbon emissions.

The announcement comes as a growing chorus of lawmakers-mostly Republicans, but some coal state Democrats as well- have criticized the EPA's decision to move forward on carbon regulations. Last year, the EPA issued a finding that the heat-trapping gases were harmful to the public, paving way for regulation under the Clean Air Act. Republicans say they're concerned the regulations will hurt the economy.

"The last thing we need in this economy is new jobs that amount to a new tax on energy," said Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio). "This really amounts to an attack on the private sector."

As the article notes, the President could simply veto such legislation if it were enacted, but it would certainly not sit well in the coal states; for example, West Virginia , with its two Democratic Senators .


Clarice Feldman