Big surprise. Weatherization jobs don't materialize

Jammie Wearing Fool points us to a story that shows how the weatherization projects funded by the stim bill are "falling a little short" as far as those "green jobs" we were told would be created. "Falling short" is the Times' attempt at a little humor. In fact, the program has been a titanic failure in that regard:

After a year, the $5 billion program has retrofitted a fraction of the homes expected and created far fewer construction jobs than anticipated.

A little more than 30,000 homes have been weatherized, which is about 5 percent of the program's goal, and job creation has fallen well short of the 87,000 officials anticipated.
An Associated Press review found the program has been slowed by government rules and bureaucratic delays, as well as such questions as how much to pay contractors and how to protect historic homes during renovations.

In Alaska, Wyoming and the District of Columbia, the program has yet to produce a single job or retrofit one home.

In California, it has created 84 jobs in a state with nearly 37 million residents.

The Energy Department predicts the number of jobs created and homes completed will rise quickly as the program emerges from its startup phase.

If it ever does. Some of those "government rules" include contractors needing to pay the "prevailing" (union) wage on these projects which means fewer people will be hired no matter if it's in a "start up" phase or not.

Just another 'Bama Boondoggle" to contend with.




Jammie Wearing Fool points us to a story that shows how the weatherization projects funded by the stim bill are "falling a little short" as far as those "green jobs" we were told would be created. "Falling short" is the Times' attempt at a little humor. In fact, the program has been a titanic failure in that regard:

After a year, the $5 billion program has retrofitted a fraction of the homes expected and created far fewer construction jobs than anticipated.

A little more than 30,000 homes have been weatherized, which is about 5 percent of the program's goal, and job creation has fallen well short of the 87,000 officials anticipated.

An Associated Press review found the program has been slowed by government rules and bureaucratic delays, as well as such questions as how much to pay contractors and how to protect historic homes during renovations.

In Alaska, Wyoming and the District of Columbia, the program has yet to produce a single job or retrofit one home.

In California, it has created 84 jobs in a state with nearly 37 million residents.

The Energy Department predicts the number of jobs created and homes completed will rise quickly as the program emerges from its startup phase.

If it ever does. Some of those "government rules" include contractors needing to pay the "prevailing" (union) wage on these projects which means fewer people will be hired no matter if it's in a "start up" phase or not.

Just another 'Bama Boondoggle" to contend with.




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