Comedy gold: Obama claims he's a 'fierce advocate' of free market

Rick Moran
Let's play a game. We'll call it "Counter-Intuitive." Take any historical personage and make them a "fierce advocate" for whatever is exactly the opposite of what they're known for.

Examples: Genghis Khan: A fierce advocate of mercy shown to one's enemies.

Adolf Hitler: A fierce advocate of Zionism.

Martin Luther King: A fierce advocate of violent revolution.

Bill Clinton: A fierce advocate of chastity.

Or how about this one: Barack Obama - fierce advocate of the free market:

President Obama insisted that he and his administration have pursued a "fundamentally business-friendly" agenda and are "fierce advocates" for the free market, rejecting corporate criticism of his policies."The irony is that on the left we are perceived as being in the pockets of big business, and then on the business side we are perceived as being anti-business," Obama said in an interview this week with Bloomberg BusinessWeek. "You would be hard pressed to identify a piece of legislation that we have proposed out there that, net, is not good for businesses," he added. He predicted that legislation he will sign this year would cut corporate taxes by about $70 billion.

In an effort to make U.S. products more attractive, Obama set a year-end goal for persuading China to allow the value of its currency to rise. He said his administration is "going to have some very serious negotiations" with China that are "going to be bumpy."

During the interview, Obama was asked about the $17 million bonus awarded to J.P. Morgan Chase chief executive Jamie Dimon or the $9 million award issued to Goldman Sachs chief executive Lloyd Blankfein.

The president said that while $17 million is "an extraordinary amount of money" for Main Street, "there are some baseball players who are making more than that and don't get to the World Series either, so I'm shocked by that, as well."

The left, of course, is having apoplexy over the bonus business. But the curious thing is that the president is equating his cozying up to huge banks with advocating a "free market." The law professor believes that J.P. Morgan, Citigroup, and other "too big to fail" entities actually want a free market. That's the absolute last thing those quaisi-government entities want to see. They much prefer their special relationship with Washington who will bail them out when they get too greedy and blow things up. They, and many other large corporations, are the antithesis of the free market, and yet Obama can't tell the difference between businesses that compete in a real marketplace and businesses that want government to tilt the marketplace in their favor.

To make these statements of Obama's even more laughable, Dan Riehl points out why the president might not "begrudge" those two bank execs their huge bonuses:

Well, Dimon has given over $100k just to the DSCC. Plus individual candidate donations, most of which go to Democrats.

And Blankfein gives almost all of his donations to Democrats - $136k to $4k.

Why should Obama care, his party is getting its cut?

It is depressing, this man's ignorance of the basic forces of freedom that are at the core of American society. Never having worked in the private sector, or forced to meet a payroll, the cynicism and titanic arrogance it takes to believe that he can make a statement in support of the free market and think that the American people will simply ignore everything his government has tried to do to destroy it over the last year is ridiculous.

If this is his idea of "pivoting" toward the middle, he just fell flat on his face.





Let's play a game. We'll call it "Counter-Intuitive." Take any historical personage and make them a "fierce advocate" for whatever is exactly the opposite of what they're known for.

Examples: Genghis Khan: A fierce advocate of mercy shown to one's enemies.

Adolf Hitler: A fierce advocate of Zionism.

Martin Luther King: A fierce advocate of violent revolution.

Bill Clinton: A fierce advocate of chastity.

Or how about this one: Barack Obama - fierce advocate of the free market:

President Obama insisted that he and his administration have pursued a "fundamentally business-friendly" agenda and are "fierce advocates" for the free market, rejecting corporate criticism of his policies.

"The irony is that on the left we are perceived as being in the pockets of big business, and then on the business side we are perceived as being anti-business," Obama said in an interview this week with Bloomberg BusinessWeek. "You would be hard pressed to identify a piece of legislation that we have proposed out there that, net, is not good for businesses," he added. He predicted that legislation he will sign this year would cut corporate taxes by about $70 billion.

In an effort to make U.S. products more attractive, Obama set a year-end goal for persuading China to allow the value of its currency to rise. He said his administration is "going to have some very serious negotiations" with China that are "going to be bumpy."

During the interview, Obama was asked about the $17 million bonus awarded to J.P. Morgan Chase chief executive Jamie Dimon or the $9 million award issued to Goldman Sachs chief executive Lloyd Blankfein.

The president said that while $17 million is "an extraordinary amount of money" for Main Street, "there are some baseball players who are making more than that and don't get to the World Series either, so I'm shocked by that, as well."

The left, of course, is having apoplexy over the bonus business. But the curious thing is that the president is equating his cozying up to huge banks with advocating a "free market." The law professor believes that J.P. Morgan, Citigroup, and other "too big to fail" entities actually want a free market. That's the absolute last thing those quaisi-government entities want to see. They much prefer their special relationship with Washington who will bail them out when they get too greedy and blow things up. They, and many other large corporations, are the antithesis of the free market, and yet Obama can't tell the difference between businesses that compete in a real marketplace and businesses that want government to tilt the marketplace in their favor.

To make these statements of Obama's even more laughable, Dan Riehl points out why the president might not "begrudge" those two bank execs their huge bonuses:

Well, Dimon has given over $100k just to the DSCC. Plus individual candidate donations, most of which go to Democrats.

And Blankfein gives almost all of his donations to Democrats - $136k to $4k.

Why should Obama care, his party is getting its cut?

It is depressing, this man's ignorance of the basic forces of freedom that are at the core of American society. Never having worked in the private sector, or forced to meet a payroll, the cynicism and titanic arrogance it takes to believe that he can make a statement in support of the free market and think that the American people will simply ignore everything his government has tried to do to destroy it over the last year is ridiculous.

If this is his idea of "pivoting" toward the middle, he just fell flat on his face.