Cheap shots from Meghan McCain

With a new book due out in August, Meghan McCain is still throwing cheap shots at the Right in hopes of building up her liberal fan base to sell books. ABC News reports:

Meghan McCain, the daughter of former GOP presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and a self-described "progressive Republican," today assailed the tea party movement.

Sitting in as co-host on "The View" today, McCain said she has ideological differences with the movement.

She specifically took aim at remarks by former Congressman Tom Tancredo, who suggested that people who voted for President Obama could not pass a basic civics literacy test.

(snip)

 

"It's innate racism, and I think it's why young people are turned off by this movement," McCain charged of Tancredo's remarks. "Revolutions start with young people, not with 65-year-old people talking about literacy tests and people who can't say the word vote in English. It's ridiculous."

 

(snip)

This is not the first time McCain has criticized the tea party movement.

Speaking at the University of Florida last month, the 25-year-old downplayed their influence.

"These people are not as relevant as they say they are," she said. "I think my father would be president if they were really that powerful."

First, Tom Tancredo speaks for himself, not for the millions of Americans who have participated in the Tea Party Movement. To make an assertion that the entire movement has any undertone of racism based off the comment of one individual is irresponsible at best. Unfortunately rather than sounding like an educated political pundit, she puts herself on the level of a Janeane Garafalo.

Second, apparently in her mind it came to pass that she was allowed to judge the relevancy of others the day she became John McCain's daughter. If it weren't for the Tea Party Movement perhaps the Obama train would be rolling along the tracks unfettered, but it is these empowered Americans who have played a role in making sure that the train has had to make stops. There have been individuals throughout this movement who have epitomized what leadership is all about, they are making history. We know how desperately Meghan wants to be the voice for young people on the right, but who's following her?

What coalition has she built?

What movement has she started?

Lastly, let us remind Meghan that while some of the issues the movement has addressed are pre-Obama Adminsitration, i.e. TARP, the people didn't take their voice to the streets until after Obama came into office, so how is it exactly the movement could have played a role in her father being elected president?

Fortunately, unlike the Tea Party Movement, not too many people are following Meghan McCain, we know that her interest is only in herself, not the country that us on the Right truly cherish.

J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com

 

 

 

 


With a new book due out in August, Meghan McCain is still throwing cheap shots at the Right in hopes of building up her liberal fan base to sell books.

ABC News reports:

Meghan McCain, the daughter of former GOP presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and a self-described "progressive Republican," today assailed the tea party movement.

Sitting in as co-host on "The View" today, McCain said she has ideological differences with the movement.

She specifically took aim at remarks by former Congressman Tom Tancredo, who suggested that people who voted for President Obama could not pass a basic civics literacy test.

(snip)

 

"It's innate racism, and I think it's why young people are turned off by this movement," McCain charged of Tancredo's remarks. "Revolutions start with young people, not with 65-year-old people talking about literacy tests and people who can't say the word vote in English. It's ridiculous."

 

(snip)

This is not the first time McCain has criticized the tea party movement.

Speaking at the University of Florida last month, the 25-year-old downplayed their influence.

"These people are not as relevant as they say they are," she said. "I think my father would be president if they were really that powerful."

First, Tom Tancredo speaks for himself, not for the millions of Americans who have participated in the Tea Party Movement. To make an assertion that the entire movement has any undertone of racism based off the comment of one individual is irresponsible at best. Unfortunately rather than sounding like an educated political pundit, she puts herself on the level of a Janeane Garafalo.

Second, apparently in her mind it came to pass that she was allowed to judge the relevancy of others the day she became John McCain's daughter. If it weren't for the Tea Party Movement perhaps the Obama train would be rolling along the tracks unfettered, but it is these empowered Americans who have played a role in making sure that the train has had to make stops. There have been individuals throughout this movement who have epitomized what leadership is all about, they are making history. We know how desperately Meghan wants to be the voice for young people on the right, but who's following her?

What coalition has she built?

What movement has she started?

Lastly, let us remind Meghan that while some of the issues the movement has addressed are pre-Obama Adminsitration, i.e. TARP, the people didn't take their voice to the streets until after Obama came into office, so how is it exactly the movement could have played a role in her father being elected president?

Fortunately, unlike the Tea Party Movement, not too many people are following Meghan McCain, we know that her interest is only in herself, not the country that us on the Right truly cherish.

J.C. Arenas is a frequent contributor to American Thinker and welcomes your comments at jcarenas.com