Schumer hurt by Supreme Court campaign finance ruling

Clarice Feldman
Senator Chuck Schumer is, next to the President (who famously reneged himself on his promise to accept only public financing for his election run) most enraged by the Supreme Court decision invalidating key portions of the 2002 Campaign Finance reform Act.

The Washington Examiner's Timothy Carney lifts the veil on why: He has a lot to lose.

[S]et free of from Congress's speech regulations, non-profits and corporations might not rely so much on these indirect means of political influence. That means less campaign cash coming into Schumer, fewer corporations courting Schumer's staff, and less sucking up to Schumer by lobbyists.

Clarice Feldman


Senator Chuck Schumer is, next to the President (who famously reneged himself on his promise to accept only public financing for his election run) most enraged by the Supreme Court decision invalidating key portions of the 2002 Campaign Finance reform Act.

The Washington Examiner's Timothy Carney lifts the veil on why: He has a lot to lose.

[S]et free of from Congress's speech regulations, non-profits and corporations might not rely so much on these indirect means of political influence. That means less campaign cash coming into Schumer, fewer corporations courting Schumer's staff, and less sucking up to Schumer by lobbyists.

Clarice Feldman