Axelrod's battle plan for 2010

In an interview with National Journal Online, David Axelrod offered insights into how the White House will shape the midterm campaigns against the Republicans.

Axelrod's checklist includes improvement in the economy, some (but not vastly more) legislative action and, most pointedly, an effort to draw sharper contrasts with Republican positions. 

Mr. Axelrod will also use that famous database of millions of voters and contributors to relay to Democratic Party constituents the need to go to the polls in November.  According to the article, he will search out “irregular” voters.  Who could they be—maybe illegal aliens with driver’s licenses, or convicted felons, or homeless people who don’t give a care who runs the country or how the government is driving our economy into bankruptcy.

Isolate the target, demonize it, and destroy it.  The ‘it’ here means Republicans, and the WH advisor intends to repeat the message that the Republican policies of the Bush years brought the U.S. to the brink of disaster.  He will not talk about Congress ignoring the brewing mortgage crisis, or 9/11 and the cost of the war on terror because these are real reasons that contributed to our present day ills. 

The boldest and most telling of Axelrod’s statements follows:

"They want to stand with the insurance industry on health care and protect the status quo, then let them defend that in an election," Axelrod said. "If they want to stand with the banks and the financial industries, and protect the status quo, then let them explain that in an election. If the party that over eight years turned a... surplus into the most significant growth in national debt by far in the history of the country and left this president with a $1.3 trillion deficit when he walked in the door and an economic crisis, let them campaign on fiscal integrity. You know... we're certainly willing to have that discussion.

Republicans—status quo: that will be the mantra of the Left. 

And here’s the kicker:

“The difference is that we'll have that discussion in the context of a campaign, and we haven't, in the midst of a crisis, tried to campaign every day in the halls of Congress."

No campaigning in the halls of Congress during this economic crisis?  This is a bald-faced lie.  There have been so many lobbyists crafting deals on behalf of the White House that it leaves one wondering whether every single member of Congress has been solicited into supporting the Democrat Party.

In order to continue to collapse our economy so that the government/state will control the means of production, Axelrod and Company must keep the people believing their lies.  They have to hold onto political power.

Later in the article, Axelrod brings up Reagan’s circumstances in 1982 and compares them to those of today.  Back then, unemployment was at 10%, and people weren’t satisfied that Reaganomics was working until they understood that his economic policies were geared toward the long run.  Reagan held firm to his fiscal conservatism, but the Republican Party lost about 25 seats in the House at the midterm elections. 

“In certain ways we are at the mercy of forces that are larger than things we can control," Axelrod said. "If we see steady months of jobs growth between now and next November, I think the picture will be different than if we don't. I think Ronald Reagan learned that lesson in 1982. 

From Gallup:

Things got worse for Reagan in 1982. The public's view of the economy remained sour, and the president's ratings during 1982 stayed concomitantly low, in the 40% range, ending the year at 41%. The 1982 midterm elections were not good ones for Reagan and for the GOP.

A clear cause for all of this was the economy.

Axelrod appears to be signaling that the Democrats won’t be suffering the same fate this fall as Republicans did in 1982.  His plan to be aggressive in recruiting voters along with legislative action on financial reform will contribute to the goal of keeping control of the Congress.

In an interview with National Journal Online, David Axelrod offered insights into how the White House will shape the midterm campaigns against the Republicans.

Axelrod's checklist includes improvement in the economy, some (but not vastly more) legislative action and, most pointedly, an effort to draw sharper contrasts with Republican positions. 

Mr. Axelrod will also use that famous database of millions of voters and contributors to relay to Democratic Party constituents the need to go to the polls in November.  According to the article, he will search out “irregular” voters.  Who could they be—maybe illegal aliens with driver’s licenses, or convicted felons, or homeless people who don’t give a care who runs the country or how the government is driving our economy into bankruptcy.

Isolate the target, demonize it, and destroy it.  The ‘it’ here means Republicans, and the WH advisor intends to repeat the message that the Republican policies of the Bush years brought the U.S. to the brink of disaster.  He will not talk about Congress ignoring the brewing mortgage crisis, or 9/11 and the cost of the war on terror because these are real reasons that contributed to our present day ills. 

The boldest and most telling of Axelrod’s statements follows:

"They want to stand with the insurance industry on health care and protect the status quo, then let them defend that in an election," Axelrod said. "If they want to stand with the banks and the financial industries, and protect the status quo, then let them explain that in an election. If the party that over eight years turned a... surplus into the most significant growth in national debt by far in the history of the country and left this president with a $1.3 trillion deficit when he walked in the door and an economic crisis, let them campaign on fiscal integrity. You know... we're certainly willing to have that discussion.

Republicans—status quo: that will be the mantra of the Left. 

And here’s the kicker:

“The difference is that we'll have that discussion in the context of a campaign, and we haven't, in the midst of a crisis, tried to campaign every day in the halls of Congress."

No campaigning in the halls of Congress during this economic crisis?  This is a bald-faced lie.  There have been so many lobbyists crafting deals on behalf of the White House that it leaves one wondering whether every single member of Congress has been solicited into supporting the Democrat Party.

In order to continue to collapse our economy so that the government/state will control the means of production, Axelrod and Company must keep the people believing their lies.  They have to hold onto political power.

Later in the article, Axelrod brings up Reagan’s circumstances in 1982 and compares them to those of today.  Back then, unemployment was at 10%, and people weren’t satisfied that Reaganomics was working until they understood that his economic policies were geared toward the long run.  Reagan held firm to his fiscal conservatism, but the Republican Party lost about 25 seats in the House at the midterm elections. 

“In certain ways we are at the mercy of forces that are larger than things we can control," Axelrod said. "If we see steady months of jobs growth between now and next November, I think the picture will be different than if we don't. I think Ronald Reagan learned that lesson in 1982. 

From Gallup:

Things got worse for Reagan in 1982. The public's view of the economy remained sour, and the president's ratings during 1982 stayed concomitantly low, in the 40% range, ending the year at 41%. The 1982 midterm elections were not good ones for Reagan and for the GOP.

A clear cause for all of this was the economy.

Axelrod appears to be signaling that the Democrats won’t be suffering the same fate this fall as Republicans did in 1982.  His plan to be aggressive in recruiting voters along with legislative action on financial reform will contribute to the goal of keeping control of the Congress.

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