1 in 5 released Gitmo detainees return to terrorism

Ethel C. Fenig
The NY Times posts an unsettling Reuters story on another ostensibly

classified Pentagon assessment shows one in five detainees released from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay has joined or is suspected of joining militant groups like al Qaeda, U.S. officials said on Wednesday.

(snip)A previous Pentagon assessment last April showed that 14 percent of former detainees had joined or were suspected of joining militant groups, up from 11 percent in December 2008.

Two officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the new Pentagon assessment showed the percentage had grown to 20 percent.

Pentagon press secretary Geoff Morrell declined to comment on the latest figures, saying they remained classified, but told reporters, "The trend hasn't reversed itself."

"This is an inexact science," Morrell said about whether enough screening was done of detainees in the past. "You know, we are making subjective calls based upon judgement, intelligence. And so there is no foolproof answer in this realm. That's what makes this so difficult."

But he added, "There needs to be a better accounting of detainees."

"A better accounting of detainees." Yes. Perhaps their new motto should be when in doubt, don't let them out.


The NY Times posts an unsettling Reuters story on another ostensibly

classified Pentagon assessment shows one in five detainees released from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay has joined or is suspected of joining militant groups like al Qaeda, U.S. officials said on Wednesday.

(snip)

A previous Pentagon assessment last April showed that 14 percent of former detainees had joined or were suspected of joining militant groups, up from 11 percent in December 2008.

Two officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the new Pentagon assessment showed the percentage had grown to 20 percent.

Pentagon press secretary Geoff Morrell declined to comment on the latest figures, saying they remained classified, but told reporters, "The trend hasn't reversed itself."

"This is an inexact science," Morrell said about whether enough screening was done of detainees in the past. "You know, we are making subjective calls based upon judgement, intelligence. And so there is no foolproof answer in this realm. That's what makes this so difficult."

But he added, "There needs to be a better accounting of detainees."

"A better accounting of detainees." Yes. Perhaps their new motto should be when in doubt, don't let them out.