Sarah Palin weighs in on Climategate

C. Edmund Wright
There has been call among conservatives for Sarah Palin to weigh in on the climate gate scandal, and tonight she has.Via her favorite forum for chiming in on the national conversation, Facebook, she has issued the following statement:

The president's decision to attend the international climate conference in Copenhagen needs to be reconsidered in light of the unfolding Climategate scandal. The leaked e-mails involved in Climategate expose the unscientific behavior of leading climate scientists who deliberately destroyed records to block information requests, manipulated data to "hide the decline" in global temperatures, and conspired to silence the critics of man-made global warming. I support Senator James Inhofe's call for a full investigation into this scandal. Because it involves many of the same personalities and entities behind the Copenhagen conference, Climategate calls into question many of the proposals being pushed there, including anything that would lead to a cap and tax plan.

Policy should be based on sound science, not snake oil. I took a stand against such snake oil science when I sued the federal government over its decision to list the polar bear as an endangered species despite the fact that the polar bear population has increased. I've never denied the reality of climate change; in fact, I was the first governor to create a subcabinet position to deal specifically with the issue. I saw the impact of changing weather patterns firsthand while serving as governor of our only Arctic state. But while we recognize the effects of changing water levels, erosion patterns, and glacial ice melt, we cannot primarily blame man's activities for the earth's cyclical weather changes. The drastic economic measures being pushed by dogmatic environmentalists won't change the weather, but will dramatically change our economy for the worse.

Policy decisions require real science and real solutions, not junk science and doomsday scare tactics pushed by an environmental priesthood that capitalizes on the public's worry and makes them feel that owning an SUV is a "sin" against the planet. In his inaugural address, President Obama declared his intention to "restore science to its rightful place." Boycotting Copenhagen while this scandal is thoroughly investigated would send a strong message that the United States government will not be a party to fraudulent scientific practices. Saying no to Copenhagen and cap and tax are first steps in "restoring science to its rightful place."

- Sarah Palin

What is particularly effective is her use of Barack Obama's words against him. Twice she recites the "restore science to its rightful place" phrase, including her final sentence challenge. She also backs up her own credibility on the subject with practical experience she had as governor of the nation's only glacial state. Unwritten is the fact that Obama was merely a community organizer at that time.

Some would have liked something from Palin a bit sooner on this subject, but in light of the Copenhagen announcement, this timing is effective. Perhaps the Jurassic media will notice that she is once again tackling a serious subject with facts and linear thinking. A subject, in fact, dominated by unserious science for decades.


There has been call among conservatives for Sarah Palin to weigh in on the climate gate scandal, and tonight she has.

Via her favorite forum for chiming in on the national conversation, Facebook, she has issued the following statement:

The president's decision to attend the international climate conference in Copenhagen needs to be reconsidered in light of the unfolding Climategate scandal. The leaked e-mails involved in Climategate expose the unscientific behavior of leading climate scientists who deliberately destroyed records to block information requests, manipulated data to "hide the decline" in global temperatures, and conspired to silence the critics of man-made global warming. I support Senator James Inhofe's call for a full investigation into this scandal. Because it involves many of the same personalities and entities behind the Copenhagen conference, Climategate calls into question many of the proposals being pushed there, including anything that would lead to a cap and tax plan.

Policy should be based on sound science, not snake oil. I took a stand against such snake oil science when I sued the federal government over its decision to list the polar bear as an endangered species despite the fact that the polar bear population has increased. I've never denied the reality of climate change; in fact, I was the first governor to create a subcabinet position to deal specifically with the issue. I saw the impact of changing weather patterns firsthand while serving as governor of our only Arctic state. But while we recognize the effects of changing water levels, erosion patterns, and glacial ice melt, we cannot primarily blame man's activities for the earth's cyclical weather changes. The drastic economic measures being pushed by dogmatic environmentalists won't change the weather, but will dramatically change our economy for the worse.

Policy decisions require real science and real solutions, not junk science and doomsday scare tactics pushed by an environmental priesthood that capitalizes on the public's worry and makes them feel that owning an SUV is a "sin" against the planet. In his inaugural address, President Obama declared his intention to "restore science to its rightful place." Boycotting Copenhagen while this scandal is thoroughly investigated would send a strong message that the United States government will not be a party to fraudulent scientific practices. Saying no to Copenhagen and cap and tax are first steps in "restoring science to its rightful place."

- Sarah Palin

What is particularly effective is her use of Barack Obama's words against him. Twice she recites the "restore science to its rightful place" phrase, including her final sentence challenge. She also backs up her own credibility on the subject with practical experience she had as governor of the nation's only glacial state. Unwritten is the fact that Obama was merely a community organizer at that time.

Some would have liked something from Palin a bit sooner on this subject, but in light of the Copenhagen announcement, this timing is effective. Perhaps the Jurassic media will notice that she is once again tackling a serious subject with facts and linear thinking. A subject, in fact, dominated by unserious science for decades.