Legislating discrimination

Hans von Spakovsky at NRO catches yet another few provisions in the Reid bill that seem to conflict not only with common sense and good medical practice but with the constitution as well:

It directs the secretary of health and human services to award federal grants worth billions of dollars to educational institutions that train medical-service providers. However, "priority" for federal dollars is to be given only to those institutions offering "preferential" admissions to underrepresented minorities (according to race, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, and religion, depending on which section of the bill you look at). Thus, schools will be unable to compete for essential federal funding unless they adopt admission policies that intentionally and deliberately discriminate. It guarantees the institution of racist and sexist quotas sanctioned and encouraged by the federal government in what Linda Chavez of the Center for Equal Opportunity correctly calls "a new racial spoils system."

The bill also declares that institutions training social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, behavioral pediatricians, psychiatric nurses, and counselors will be ineligible for federal grants unless they discriminate. According to Section 756, these programs must enroll "individuals and groups from different racial, ethnic, cultural, geographic, religious, linguistic, and class backgrounds, and different genders and sexual orientations" and demonstrate "knowledge and understanding of the concerns of the[se] individuals and groups." If the schools fail to abide by these requirements, they will be liable for "liquidated damages."

The Senate bill even creates a federally funded and administered medical school called the United States Public Health Services Track to "grant appropriate advanced degrees." Priority in admissions is to be given to "students from rural communities and underrepresented minorities." ("Underrepresented minorities" is liberal code for "Asians need not apply.")

[...]

 One provision even requires the secretary of health and human services to consult with "representatives of racial and ethnic minorities" about the content of promotional labels or print ads for drugs. Racial politics is poised to trump scientific accuracy in drug labeling."

Hans von Spakovsky at NRO catches yet another few provisions in the Reid bill that seem to conflict not only with common sense and good medical practice but with the constitution as well:

It directs the secretary of health and human services to award federal grants worth billions of dollars to educational institutions that train medical-service providers. However, "priority" for federal dollars is to be given only to those institutions offering "preferential" admissions to underrepresented minorities (according to race, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, and religion, depending on which section of the bill you look at). Thus, schools will be unable to compete for essential federal funding unless they adopt admission policies that intentionally and deliberately discriminate. It guarantees the institution of racist and sexist quotas sanctioned and encouraged by the federal government in what Linda Chavez of the Center for Equal Opportunity correctly calls "a new racial spoils system."

The bill also declares that institutions training social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, behavioral pediatricians, psychiatric nurses, and counselors will be ineligible for federal grants unless they discriminate. According to Section 756, these programs must enroll "individuals and groups from different racial, ethnic, cultural, geographic, religious, linguistic, and class backgrounds, and different genders and sexual orientations" and demonstrate "knowledge and understanding of the concerns of the[se] individuals and groups." If the schools fail to abide by these requirements, they will be liable for "liquidated damages."

The Senate bill even creates a federally funded and administered medical school called the United States Public Health Services Track to "grant appropriate advanced degrees." Priority in admissions is to be given to "students from rural communities and underrepresented minorities." ("Underrepresented minorities" is liberal code for "Asians need not apply.")

[...]

 One provision even requires the secretary of health and human services to consult with "representatives of racial and ethnic minorities" about the content of promotional labels or print ads for drugs. Racial politics is poised to trump scientific accuracy in drug labeling."

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