Freedom from responsibility; the Hierarchy of Needs

According to the late Professor Abraham Maslow, all humans have needs. He organized these needs in to a pyramid. This pyramid is known as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. At the bottom of the pyramid are the most basic of needs to stay alive such as air, water and food. The pyramid continues up to include things such as safety needs, belonging needs, esteem needs and topping out with self actualization. It is this pyramid that is often use by liberal "thinkers" to justify many social programs. As we listen to the Senate debate on the "Healthcare Reform Bill," which is designed to provide "free" healthcare for anyone within our borders, what is absent is the questions of whether it is constitutional. In the preamble of the U.S. Constitution its states "...provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare...." According to constitutional scholars these words have meaning. "Promote the general welfare" could be argued is the justification for "healthcare reform" but let's peal back another layer of the onion. Provide for is a specific statement to actively engage in defense of the nation. By contrast promote is more of passive statement designed to prevent the government from obstructing. This subtly of this fact is seemingly lost on Congress.

So if we should have free healthcare why not free housing, its part of the Hierarchy of Needs? However, Malsow's Hierarchy of Needs is not part of the constitution. This fact too is lost on the Congress.

The great 19th century historian Edward Gibbon wrote that at the height of their civilization the Athenians were the freest in the world. Despite this the Athenians sought more and more freedom until they wanted the one freedom that would eliminate all others and that was the freedom from responsibility. The debate over the "Healthcare Reform Bill" is a debate of personal responsibility. If our bodies are protected by the right to privacy as it was decided by the Supreme Court in the infamous case of Roe v. Wade, then how can we surrender the health of our bodies to the control of the government? If we free ourselves from this responsibility we will lose our liberty.


According to the late Professor Abraham Maslow, all humans have needs. He organized these needs in to a pyramid. This pyramid is known as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. At the bottom of the pyramid are the most basic of needs to stay alive such as air, water and food. The pyramid continues up to include things such as safety needs, belonging needs, esteem needs and topping out with self actualization. It is this pyramid that is often use by liberal "thinkers" to justify many social programs.

As we listen to the Senate debate on the "Healthcare Reform Bill," which is designed to provide "free" healthcare for anyone within our borders, what is absent is the questions of whether it is constitutional. In the preamble of the U.S. Constitution its states "...provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare...." According to constitutional scholars these words have meaning. "Promote the general welfare" could be argued is the justification for "healthcare reform" but let's peal back another layer of the onion. Provide for is a specific statement to actively engage in defense of the nation. By contrast promote is more of passive statement designed to prevent the government from obstructing. This subtly of this fact is seemingly lost on Congress.

So if we should have free healthcare why not free housing, its part of the Hierarchy of Needs? However, Malsow's Hierarchy of Needs is not part of the constitution. This fact too is lost on the Congress.

The great 19th century historian Edward Gibbon wrote that at the height of their civilization the Athenians were the freest in the world. Despite this the Athenians sought more and more freedom until they wanted the one freedom that would eliminate all others and that was the freedom from responsibility. The debate over the "Healthcare Reform Bill" is a debate of personal responsibility. If our bodies are protected by the right to privacy as it was decided by the Supreme Court in the infamous case of Roe v. Wade, then how can we surrender the health of our bodies to the control of the government? If we free ourselves from this responsibility we will lose our liberty.


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