First person account of flight #253

Ethel C. Fenig
Over at the Huffington Post, Roey Rosenblith, a passenger on Northwest flight 253, describes how a routine flight from Amsterdam to Detroit suddenly turned almost deadly. Jason Schuringa, for now the Dutch hero who rushed the (alleged) terrorist speaks about his actions. Chilling. It could have been any of us on any flight.

So just remember this, when proving they're doing something, anything! to keep you safe, (except of course to update and name the potential dangerous terrorists barred from flying, barred from entering this country, no matter how politically incorrect) Homeland Security and the Transportation Department demand that you arrive at the airport even earlier, strip, don a hospital gown (front closing if you're lucky) and go through the scanners. And oh, probably no electronics --laptops, iPhones, Kindles, CD players--either according  to MG Siegler, not to mention no bathroom trips during the last hour of a long, international flight. The Washington Post posted  some new, quicky safety rules for incoming overseas flights. Here's one:

U.S.-bound passengers aboard international flights must undergo a "thorough pat-down" at boarding gates, focused on the upper legs and torso. All carry-on baggage must be inspected.

Ok, so no strip searches in hospital gowns. Yet.

And now, sit back, relax and enjoy your flight!
Over at the Huffington Post, Roey Rosenblith, a passenger on Northwest flight 253, describes how a routine flight from Amsterdam to Detroit suddenly turned almost deadly. Jason Schuringa, for now the Dutch hero who rushed the (alleged) terrorist speaks about his actions. Chilling. It could have been any of us on any flight.

So just remember this, when proving they're doing something, anything! to keep you safe, (except of course to update and name the potential dangerous terrorists barred from flying, barred from entering this country, no matter how politically incorrect) Homeland Security and the Transportation Department demand that you arrive at the airport even earlier, strip, don a hospital gown (front closing if you're lucky) and go through the scanners. And oh, probably no electronics --laptops, iPhones, Kindles, CD players--either according  to MG Siegler, not to mention no bathroom trips during the last hour of a long, international flight. The Washington Post posted  some new, quicky safety rules for incoming overseas flights. Here's one:

U.S.-bound passengers aboard international flights must undergo a "thorough pat-down" at boarding gates, focused on the upper legs and torso. All carry-on baggage must be inspected.

Ok, so no strip searches in hospital gowns. Yet.

And now, sit back, relax and enjoy your flight!