Unions big losers in this election

Michael Barone notes how much unions have been shoveling into Dem coffers and how much has been repaid to them by the party, but suggests that they are the big losers in this election because card check--- the centerpiece of the SEIU  head Andy Stern's agenda -- is dead. And he tells us why that's so:
The big-government programs of Obama Democrats evidently have less appeal than those trendy posters and inspiring rallies and cries of "We are the change we are seeking." I have yet to see survey research showing that young Americans want to work under union contracts, with their 5,000 pages of work rules and rigid seniority systems. That doesn't sound like a tune that appeals to the iPod generation.

Economically, the Obama majority was a top-and-bottom coalition. The Democratic ticket carried voters with incomes under $50,000 and over $200,000, and lost those in between. As the shrewd liberal analyst Thomas Edsall has noted, there's a tension between what these groups want. High earners in non-Southern suburbs have been voting Democratic since the mid-1990s largely because of their liberal views on cultural issues; low earners vote Democratic because they want more government money shoveled their way.

Tuesday's elections suggest those whose money gets shoveled are having second thoughts about this odd-couple coalition.


Michael Barone notes how much unions have been shoveling into Dem coffers and how much has been repaid to them by the party, but suggests that they are the big losers in this election because card check--- the centerpiece of the SEIU  head Andy Stern's agenda -- is dead. And he tells us why that's so:
The big-government programs of Obama Democrats evidently have less appeal than those trendy posters and inspiring rallies and cries of "We are the change we are seeking." I have yet to see survey research showing that young Americans want to work under union contracts, with their 5,000 pages of work rules and rigid seniority systems. That doesn't sound like a tune that appeals to the iPod generation.

Economically, the Obama majority was a top-and-bottom coalition. The Democratic ticket carried voters with incomes under $50,000 and over $200,000, and lost those in between. As the shrewd liberal analyst Thomas Edsall has noted, there's a tension between what these groups want. High earners in non-Southern suburbs have been voting Democratic since the mid-1990s largely because of their liberal views on cultural issues; low earners vote Democratic because they want more government money shoveled their way.

Tuesday's elections suggest those whose money gets shoveled are having second thoughts about this odd-couple coalition.