How's that election 'victory' working out for you Democrats?

Rick Moran
It looks like the Democratic/media spin that it was a good night for the majority last Tuesday didn't have much shelf life.

That's because 7 of the 12 most vulnerable House members - those first term congressmen who represent districts won by McCain in 2008 - have all come out against the health care reform bill in the last 24 hours.

Riddle me this: If the Democrats had such a good night on Tuesday, why are these members running as fast as they can away from the president's and their party's top legislative priority?

USA Today's Congress Team:

There are a dozen first-term Democrats representing districts that Republican presidential nominee John McCain won last year. So far, six have announced that they will vote against their party's health care bill.Update, 5:43 p.m. ET: Now there are seven. The New York Daily News has just published a statement from hometown Rep. Michael McMahon, D-N.Y. He's in the no column. "I believe the net negatives of this bill outweight the positive effects," McMahon says.

Five of those announcements came today. All of the lawmakers who announced opposition cited concerns about the price tag of the legislation, estimated by the Congressional Budget Office to be more than $1 trillion over 10 years.

"After months of thoroughly reviewing legislative proposals and speaking with constituents and stakeholders, I am not satisfied that this bill before us is a sustainable solution," said Rep. Frank Kratovil, D-Md. Alert readers will remember that he was the congressman hung in effigy during the height of the August town hall meeting uproar.

The other three Democratic freshmen from McCain districts who announced their opposition to the health care bill Friday are: Reps. Bobby Bright of Alabama, Walt Minnick of Idaho, and Suzanne Kosmas of Florida. Two who announced their opposition earlier: Reps. Travis Childers of Mississippi and Parker Griffith of Alabama. All but Griffith have announced their opposition since Election Day, when Democrats suffered humiliating defeats in the New Jersey and Virginia governors races.

I want to congratulate Rich Baehr, AT's political correspondent, who has been predicting this since last summer. Other vulnerable Democrats are almost certainly having similar thoughts, and I would guess that at this point, it is going to take all the muscle available to both Obama and Pelosi to get a bill passed in the House.



It looks like the Democratic/media spin that it was a good night for the majority last Tuesday didn't have much shelf life.

That's because 7 of the 12 most vulnerable House members - those first term congressmen who represent districts won by McCain in 2008 - have all come out against the health care reform bill in the last 24 hours.

Riddle me this: If the Democrats had such a good night on Tuesday, why are these members running as fast as they can away from the president's and their party's top legislative priority?

USA Today's Congress Team:

There are a dozen first-term Democrats representing districts that Republican presidential nominee John McCain won last year. So far, six have announced that they will vote against their party's health care bill.

Update, 5:43 p.m. ET: Now there are seven. The New York Daily News has just published a statement from hometown Rep. Michael McMahon, D-N.Y. He's in the no column. "I believe the net negatives of this bill outweight the positive effects," McMahon says.

Five of those announcements came today. All of the lawmakers who announced opposition cited concerns about the price tag of the legislation, estimated by the Congressional Budget Office to be more than $1 trillion over 10 years.

"After months of thoroughly reviewing legislative proposals and speaking with constituents and stakeholders, I am not satisfied that this bill before us is a sustainable solution," said Rep. Frank Kratovil, D-Md. Alert readers will remember that he was the congressman hung in effigy during the height of the August town hall meeting uproar.

The other three Democratic freshmen from McCain districts who announced their opposition to the health care bill Friday are: Reps. Bobby Bright of Alabama, Walt Minnick of Idaho, and Suzanne Kosmas of Florida. Two who announced their opposition earlier: Reps. Travis Childers of Mississippi and Parker Griffith of Alabama. All but Griffith have announced their opposition since Election Day, when Democrats suffered humiliating defeats in the New Jersey and Virginia governors races.

I want to congratulate Rich Baehr, AT's political correspondent, who has been predicting this since last summer. Other vulnerable Democrats are almost certainly having similar thoughts, and I would guess that at this point, it is going to take all the muscle available to both Obama and Pelosi to get a bill passed in the House.