They're giving away golf carts

Thanks to various incentive programs for the purchase of "electric vehicles", purchasing a golf cart can actually cost little or no money. The Wall Street Journal's Review & Outlook writes:

The federal credit provides from $4,200 to $5,500 for the purchase of an electric vehicle, and when it is combined with similar incentive plans in many states the tax credits can pay for nearly the entire cost of a golf cart. Even in states that don't have their own tax rebate plans, the federal credit is generous enough to pay for half or even two-thirds of the average sticker price of a cart, which is typically in the range of $8,000 to $10,000. "The purchase of some models could be absolutely free," Roger Gaddis of Ada Electric Cars in Oklahoma said earlier this year. "Is that about the coolest thing you've ever heard?"

The golf-cart boom has followed an IRS ruling that golf carts qualify for the electric-car credit as long as they are also road worthy. These qualifying golf carts are essentially the same as normal golf carts save for adding some safety features, such as side and rearview mirrors and three-point seat belts. They typically can go 15 to 25 miles per hour.

Ham-handed social engineering via tax policy always creates asinine waste of precious tax dollars taken from honest citizens. The market is fully capable of producing new technology cars whenever they make economic sense. Stop wasting our money on fuzzy green dreams based on a fraudulent theory.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky
Thanks to various incentive programs for the purchase of "electric vehicles", purchasing a golf cart can actually cost little or no money. The Wall Street Journal's Review & Outlook writes:

The federal credit provides from $4,200 to $5,500 for the purchase of an electric vehicle, and when it is combined with similar incentive plans in many states the tax credits can pay for nearly the entire cost of a golf cart. Even in states that don't have their own tax rebate plans, the federal credit is generous enough to pay for half or even two-thirds of the average sticker price of a cart, which is typically in the range of $8,000 to $10,000. "The purchase of some models could be absolutely free," Roger Gaddis of Ada Electric Cars in Oklahoma said earlier this year. "Is that about the coolest thing you've ever heard?"

The golf-cart boom has followed an IRS ruling that golf carts qualify for the electric-car credit as long as they are also road worthy. These qualifying golf carts are essentially the same as normal golf carts save for adding some safety features, such as side and rearview mirrors and three-point seat belts. They typically can go 15 to 25 miles per hour.

Ham-handed social engineering via tax policy always creates asinine waste of precious tax dollars taken from honest citizens. The market is fully capable of producing new technology cars whenever they make economic sense. Stop wasting our money on fuzzy green dreams based on a fraudulent theory.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky