Obama channels Castro

Ed Lasky
When I read that health insurers, the American Medical Association, bankers, utilities, and the Chamber of Commerce were chumming up with the Obama administration, I was skeptical that they would be able to work with him to moderate his radical agenda. I was also concerned that their working in concert with him would only bolster the chances of his goals being met. Opposition would be slow to mobilize as people depended on these groups to represent their interests. Their mere participation granted a degree of legitimacy to Obama and the Democratic party's plans to socialize a large part of America.

I am reading a superb book, "Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba" written by Tom Gjelten.
The book is a history of the Bacardi family (purveyors of rum,and at one time, beer) and weaves their history into the history of Cuba. The family had always been in the forefront of liberals but had met their match in Castro. There is a telling anecdote in the book. After Castro took power, businessman hoped they could work with him. Businessmen flocked towards him, eager to show they would cooperate with him. That helped him against rivals and bolstered his power.

I will let Fidel Castro tell the rest of the story:

"I said to myself, let them think as they please. The more they believe they can count on us, the more they will be surprised".
 

That also reminds me of Lenin's claim that "capitalists would sell the Bolsheviks the rope with which to hang them."

Maybe businesses are learning the hard way, the Chicago way. Health insurers are now campaigning against Obama's plans, and the Obama administration has begun to retaliate against them. Wall Street-ers are no shows for a dinner honoring Barack Obama and are no longer showering the Democratic Party with donations.

Is it too late?


When I read that health insurers, the American Medical Association, bankers, utilities, and the Chamber of Commerce were chumming up with the Obama administration, I was skeptical that they would be able to work with him to moderate his radical agenda. I was also concerned that their working in concert with him would only bolster the chances of his goals being met. Opposition would be slow to mobilize as people depended on these groups to represent their interests. Their mere participation granted a degree of legitimacy to Obama and the Democratic party's plans to socialize a large part of America.

I am reading a superb book, "Bacardi and the Long Fight for Cuba" written by Tom Gjelten.
The book is a history of the Bacardi family (purveyors of rum,and at one time, beer) and weaves their history into the history of Cuba. The family had always been in the forefront of liberals but had met their match in Castro. There is a telling anecdote in the book. After Castro took power, businessman hoped they could work with him. Businessmen flocked towards him, eager to show they would cooperate with him. That helped him against rivals and bolstered his power.

I will let Fidel Castro tell the rest of the story:

"I said to myself, let them think as they please. The more they believe they can count on us, the more they will be surprised".

 

That also reminds me of Lenin's claim that "capitalists would sell the Bolsheviks the rope with which to hang them."

Maybe businesses are learning the hard way, the Chicago way. Health insurers are now campaigning against Obama's plans, and the Obama administration has begun to retaliate against them. Wall Street-ers are no shows for a dinner honoring Barack Obama and are no longer showering the Democratic Party with donations.

Is it too late?