Kaplan on Obama's 'indecision' regarding Afghanistan

Jennifer Rubin at Commentary Contentions has an excellent analysis of Robert Kaplan's scathing critique of the president's indecision on Afghanistan:

Kaplan argues that the damage has already been done, simply by the display of agonizing and indecision. He argues that the Afghans and others around the world (e.g., Iran, India, our allies) now see a president who can neither endure the consequences of his own policy nor stand up to the mildest unease in his own political ranks. In that sense, Kaplan is right. If a Nancy Pelosi interview or a meeting with Carl Levin is enough to unnerve the president (not to mention a session with his political prognosticators), what will he do if there are antiwar rallies or resolutions in Congress, not to mention some lost congressional seats over a tough war?He has, unlike his predecessor, already tipped his hand to our adversaries. They already know that, unlike George W. Bush, this is a president with his ear to the ground and his direction focused firmly on his domestic agenda. Apply some pressure, they must now calculate, and it will pay off handsomely. Obama has, in a sense, made himself an easy mark by publicly hushing his general and elevating domestic political consultants to the war policymakers. It is a far cry from the Bush administration, in which the Republican political consultants had their heads in their hands and the commander in chief had his generals' backs.

What can you say about an administration that is taking seriously the idea of Joe Biden on what to do in Afghanistan? You can say they are not serious nor are they interested in anything except getting out of the country with the least possible damage that would rebound to themselves.

Meanwhile, the Taliban grows, Pakistan seethes, and Obama dithers.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky



Jennifer Rubin at Commentary Contentions has an excellent analysis of Robert Kaplan's scathing critique of the president's indecision on Afghanistan:

Kaplan argues that the damage has already been done, simply by the display of agonizing and indecision. He argues that the Afghans and others around the world (e.g., Iran, India, our allies) now see a president who can neither endure the consequences of his own policy nor stand up to the mildest unease in his own political ranks. In that sense, Kaplan is right. If a Nancy Pelosi interview or a meeting with Carl Levin is enough to unnerve the president (not to mention a session with his political prognosticators), what will he do if there are antiwar rallies or resolutions in Congress, not to mention some lost congressional seats over a tough war?

He has, unlike his predecessor, already tipped his hand to our adversaries. They already know that, unlike George W. Bush, this is a president with his ear to the ground and his direction focused firmly on his domestic agenda. Apply some pressure, they must now calculate, and it will pay off handsomely. Obama has, in a sense, made himself an easy mark by publicly hushing his general and elevating domestic political consultants to the war policymakers. It is a far cry from the Bush administration, in which the Republican political consultants had their heads in their hands and the commander in chief had his generals' backs.

What can you say about an administration that is taking seriously the idea of Joe Biden on what to do in Afghanistan? You can say they are not serious nor are they interested in anything except getting out of the country with the least possible damage that would rebound to themselves.

Meanwhile, the Taliban grows, Pakistan seethes, and Obama dithers.


Hat Tip: Ed Lasky