54% still favor tax cuts over health care reform

Rick Moran
Proving once again the good sense of the American people, a Rasmussen survey has found that 54% of Americans would prefer middle class tax cuts to spending money on health insurance reform.

A similar poll found almost identical numbers before the August recess:

Most members of the Senate Finance Committee were relieved this week to find that their health care reform plan will cost under $900 billion over the next 10 years and is actually projected to bring the federal deficit down by $81 billion.

But a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that most voters continue to favor middle class tax cuts over spending more money for health care reform.

Thirty-three percent (33%) of voters say new spending for health care reform is more important. But 54% rate middle class tax cuts as the priority over more health care spending. Thirteen percent (13%) aren't sure.

These findings are identical to ones just before Congress' August recess and prior to President Obama's effort to jump start his health care reform initiative with a nationally televised speech to Congress.

Although such an amendment was defeated in a party line vote in the Senate committee, 59% of voters favor putting a provision in the health care plan that would prohibit any new taxes, fees or penalties on families who make less than $250,000 a year.

The Democrats will never allow any such provision because they know darn well that in order to pay for this monstrosity, they will have to raise taxes on everybody - even on the 48% of Americans who pay no federal taxes today.

This kind of dishonesty will reap a lot of sorrow for the Democrats, but probably not until 2014 or 2016. That's because the plans for reform all kick in on January 1, 2013 - after the presidential election in 2012. It may take a year or so for the Democrats to shrug their shoulders and say, "Sorry, we underestimated the cost. If you want any insurance, we're going to have to raise your taxes."

The people are in for a rude awakening when that occurs.








Proving once again the good sense of the American people, a Rasmussen survey has found that 54% of Americans would prefer middle class tax cuts to spending money on health insurance reform.

A similar poll found almost identical numbers before the August recess:

Most members of the Senate Finance Committee were relieved this week to find that their health care reform plan will cost under $900 billion over the next 10 years and is actually projected to bring the federal deficit down by $81 billion.

But a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that most voters continue to favor middle class tax cuts over spending more money for health care reform.

Thirty-three percent (33%) of voters say new spending for health care reform is more important. But 54% rate middle class tax cuts as the priority over more health care spending. Thirteen percent (13%) aren't sure.

These findings are identical to ones just before Congress' August recess and prior to President Obama's effort to jump start his health care reform initiative with a nationally televised speech to Congress.

Although such an amendment was defeated in a party line vote in the Senate committee, 59% of voters favor putting a provision in the health care plan that would prohibit any new taxes, fees or penalties on families who make less than $250,000 a year.

The Democrats will never allow any such provision because they know darn well that in order to pay for this monstrosity, they will have to raise taxes on everybody - even on the 48% of Americans who pay no federal taxes today.

This kind of dishonesty will reap a lot of sorrow for the Democrats, but probably not until 2014 or 2016. That's because the plans for reform all kick in on January 1, 2013 - after the presidential election in 2012. It may take a year or so for the Democrats to shrug their shoulders and say, "Sorry, we underestimated the cost. If you want any insurance, we're going to have to raise your taxes."

The people are in for a rude awakening when that occurs.