3/4 of Republicans say GOP Congressmen are still out of touch

Yeah - that tea party movement sure is partisan isn't it?

The NY23 fight is only a symptom. As is made evident by this Rasmussen poll, the problem for the national Republican party runs much deeper. The results of the survey are almost identical to one taken last April. And that was prior to the 9/12 demonstration and the rise of tea party activists across the country:

President Obama told an audience at a Democratic Party fundraiser Wednesday night that Republicans often "do what they're told," but GOP voters don't think their legislators listen enough to them.Just 15% of Republicans who plan to vote in 2012 state primaries say the party's representatives in Congress have done a good job of representing Republican values.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 73% think Republicans in Congress have lost touch with GOP voters from throughout the nation. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided.
These numbers are basically unchanged from a survey in late April.

Republican women are nearly twice as likely as men to say their representatives in Congress have done a good job of representing GOP values. Younger voters tend to be less critical than their elders.
Thirty-one percent (31%) of likely GOP primary voters rate economic issues as the priority in determining how they will vote, followed by 25% who see national security issues that way. Fiscal issues are most important for 15%, while 12% cite domestic issues and seven percent (7%) cultural issues.

The scattershot strategy employed by national Republicans, as well as their inability to unite to block some of Obama's more radical agenda items has most of the rest of the party thinking they are not representing their interests.

That number won't change anytime soon - as long as the national GOP keeps the same people in leadership positions who caused this mess in the first place.





Yeah - that tea party movement sure is partisan isn't it?

The NY23 fight is only a symptom. As is made evident by this Rasmussen poll, the problem for the national Republican party runs much deeper. The results of the survey are almost identical to one taken last April. And that was prior to the 9/12 demonstration and the rise of tea party activists across the country:

President Obama told an audience at a Democratic Party fundraiser Wednesday night that Republicans often "do what they're told," but GOP voters don't think their legislators listen enough to them.

Just 15% of Republicans who plan to vote in 2012 state primaries say the party's representatives in Congress have done a good job of representing Republican values.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 73% think Republicans in Congress have lost touch with GOP voters from throughout the nation. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided.
These numbers are basically unchanged from a survey in late April.

Republican women are nearly twice as likely as men to say their representatives in Congress have done a good job of representing GOP values. Younger voters tend to be less critical than their elders.

Thirty-one percent (31%) of likely GOP primary voters rate economic issues as the priority in determining how they will vote, followed by 25% who see national security issues that way. Fiscal issues are most important for 15%, while 12% cite domestic issues and seven percent (7%) cultural issues.

The scattershot strategy employed by national Republicans, as well as their inability to unite to block some of Obama's more radical agenda items has most of the rest of the party thinking they are not representing their interests.

That number won't change anytime soon - as long as the national GOP keeps the same people in leadership positions who caused this mess in the first place.