Obama: 'The Time for Games has Passed'

With Obama as President we should expect a new level of surrealness (yes, it’s a made up word) with each approaching day. The whole experience is like a crazy dream from which many Americans would like to awaken.

Reuter’s news service reported on Obama’s Sept. 12 yes-we-can healthcare rally in Minneapolis with the caption, “Obama warns against scare tactics over healthcare.” Mr. Obama told the crowd that, “The time for games has passed. Now is the time for action.”

Hmm. What exactly are the games Obama refers to? Is he referring to the Democrats’ game of trying to rush through over 1,000 pages of unread legislation before anyone had a chance to read it? If so, the President is correct. The time for games has past. Yet, from there he jumps to asserting that, “Now is the time for action.” What does he mean by action? Surely he wouldn’t be so foolhardy as to suggest action means passing the mess of legislation of which he had hoped nobody would actually read.

Actually, it has been time for action ever since the people had the chance to read the monstrosity otherwise known as H.R. 3200. In case Obama hasn’t noticed, the people have been taking action, denouncing the legion of Obama half-truths from sea to shining sea. In fact, the people began taking action even before Obama fully read the colossal mess of proposed legislation that magically appeared out of nowhere.

Most notably, tens of thousands of protesters flooded the President’s back yard on Sept. 12; the same day he fled to Minnesota for his rally/lecture.

The only “action” Obama should be talking about is the action of honest debate. Let me clarify, since Obama is so good at talking about one thing and doing the other. Now is not the time for the action of talking about debate (while demanding no opposition). Now is the time for actual, literal, televised debate (with an actual opponent present to debate) on the far-reaching subject of healthcare “reform.”

Of course, real debate would eliminate Obama’s ability to set up invisible straw-men at his yes-we-can rallies. It’s easy to knock down a straw man with half-truths when no one is present to counter with reasoned argument.

That’s why Obama gets away with advising his followers to not be tricked by the “scare tactics” of his opponents. Yet, it was Obama who had the audacity to play the scare tactics game at his address to Congress on Sept. 9.

Here is one example Obama presented: “One man from Illinois lost his coverage in the middle of chemotherapy because his insurer found that he hadn't reported gallstones that he didn't even know about. They delayed his treatment, and he died because of it.”

And this Obama punch-line at the address tops them all: “Everyone in this room knows what will happen if we do nothing. Our deficit will grow. More families will go bankrupt. More businesses will close. More Americans will lose their coverage when they are sick and need it the most. And more will die as a result. We know these things to be true.”

Which part of that little mendacity evokes the most laughter? The part about a growing deficit if ObamaCare is not imposed? The assertion of families going bankrupt? Or the grand finale that more people will die without Obama-style healthcare? After all, “We know these things to be true.”

So who is playing the scare tactic game?

Let’s have a real debate about the inevitability of government rationing of medical treatment under Obama-style medicine. And, let’s not get hung up on the words “death panels.” The point of the argument is that under ObamaCare some unaccountable bureaucrat or bureaucrats will have to ration medical treatment if ObamaCare becomes law.

Unlike Obama’s rhetoric, that’s not gaming; that’s questioning the outcome of government-controlled healthcare.

With so much at stake we cannot afford to bypass real debate on the matter. Hence, the unprecedented Sept. 12 protest at Washington.


With Obama as President we should expect a new level of surrealness (yes, it’s a made up word) with each approaching day. The whole experience is like a crazy dream from which many Americans would like to awaken.

Reuter’s news service reported on Obama’s Sept. 12 yes-we-can healthcare rally in Minneapolis with the caption, “Obama warns against scare tactics over healthcare.” Mr. Obama told the crowd that, “The time for games has passed. Now is the time for action.”

Hmm. What exactly are the games Obama refers to? Is he referring to the Democrats’ game of trying to rush through over 1,000 pages of unread legislation before anyone had a chance to read it? If so, the President is correct. The time for games has past. Yet, from there he jumps to asserting that, “Now is the time for action.” What does he mean by action? Surely he wouldn’t be so foolhardy as to suggest action means passing the mess of legislation of which he had hoped nobody would actually read.

Actually, it has been time for action ever since the people had the chance to read the monstrosity otherwise known as H.R. 3200. In case Obama hasn’t noticed, the people have been taking action, denouncing the legion of Obama half-truths from sea to shining sea. In fact, the people began taking action even before Obama fully read the colossal mess of proposed legislation that magically appeared out of nowhere.

Most notably, tens of thousands of protesters flooded the President’s back yard on Sept. 12; the same day he fled to Minnesota for his rally/lecture.

The only “action” Obama should be talking about is the action of honest debate. Let me clarify, since Obama is so good at talking about one thing and doing the other. Now is not the time for the action of talking about debate (while demanding no opposition). Now is the time for actual, literal, televised debate (with an actual opponent present to debate) on the far-reaching subject of healthcare “reform.”

Of course, real debate would eliminate Obama’s ability to set up invisible straw-men at his yes-we-can rallies. It’s easy to knock down a straw man with half-truths when no one is present to counter with reasoned argument.

That’s why Obama gets away with advising his followers to not be tricked by the “scare tactics” of his opponents. Yet, it was Obama who had the audacity to play the scare tactics game at his address to Congress on Sept. 9.

Here is one example Obama presented: “One man from Illinois lost his coverage in the middle of chemotherapy because his insurer found that he hadn't reported gallstones that he didn't even know about. They delayed his treatment, and he died because of it.”

And this Obama punch-line at the address tops them all: “Everyone in this room knows what will happen if we do nothing. Our deficit will grow. More families will go bankrupt. More businesses will close. More Americans will lose their coverage when they are sick and need it the most. And more will die as a result. We know these things to be true.”

Which part of that little mendacity evokes the most laughter? The part about a growing deficit if ObamaCare is not imposed? The assertion of families going bankrupt? Or the grand finale that more people will die without Obama-style healthcare? After all, “We know these things to be true.”

So who is playing the scare tactic game?

Let’s have a real debate about the inevitability of government rationing of medical treatment under Obama-style medicine. And, let’s not get hung up on the words “death panels.” The point of the argument is that under ObamaCare some unaccountable bureaucrat or bureaucrats will have to ration medical treatment if ObamaCare becomes law.

Unlike Obama’s rhetoric, that’s not gaming; that’s questioning the outcome of government-controlled healthcare.

With so much at stake we cannot afford to bypass real debate on the matter. Hence, the unprecedented Sept. 12 protest at Washington.