Hypocrisy and double standards on Obama faith-based programs

Mollie Ziegler Hemingway of Christianity Today pens a wonderful essay in the Wall Street Journal on the remarkable media and activist double standards when it comes to the faith-based programs launched by President Bush, and continued by President Obama. Under the program, religious organizations may receive federal funds to carry out social programs.

When Bush launched the program, the media and activists screamed about the dangers of government money going to religious organizations. But now that Obama is in office, the concerns have abated, even though the programs remain in place. All that is different is the people giving out and receiving the funds.

Barry Lynn, the sanctimonious spokesman for Americans United for the Separation of Church and State has lost all credibility. He should be laughed off the stage from now on when he poses as a serious critic of church-state ties:
Barry Lynn, head of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, was a vocal critic of Mr. Bush's faith-based office. Now, under Mr. Obama, he serves on the advisory council's task force to improve the functioning of the office. Explaining his turnaround, he said he doesn't view Mr. Obama's office as partisan -- the way Mr. Bush's was. But acknowledging that there was no substantive difference between the offices yet, Mr. Lynn said: "We have a guarded optimism that when the advisory council, Justice and the White House act and get down to the nitty gritty, they will make this a constitutionally protected program. However, we have no proof of that and no guarantee."

Hat tip: David Paulin
Mollie Ziegler Hemingway of Christianity Today pens a wonderful essay in the Wall Street Journal on the remarkable media and activist double standards when it comes to the faith-based programs launched by President Bush, and continued by President Obama. Under the program, religious organizations may receive federal funds to carry out social programs.

When Bush launched the program, the media and activists screamed about the dangers of government money going to religious organizations. But now that Obama is in office, the concerns have abated, even though the programs remain in place. All that is different is the people giving out and receiving the funds.

Barry Lynn, the sanctimonious spokesman for Americans United for the Separation of Church and State has lost all credibility. He should be laughed off the stage from now on when he poses as a serious critic of church-state ties:
Barry Lynn, head of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, was a vocal critic of Mr. Bush's faith-based office. Now, under Mr. Obama, he serves on the advisory council's task force to improve the functioning of the office. Explaining his turnaround, he said he doesn't view Mr. Obama's office as partisan -- the way Mr. Bush's was. But acknowledging that there was no substantive difference between the offices yet, Mr. Lynn said: "We have a guarded optimism that when the advisory council, Justice and the White House act and get down to the nitty gritty, they will make this a constitutionally protected program. However, we have no proof of that and no guarantee."

Hat tip: David Paulin