Dems on playing the race card: 'You ain't seen nothin' yet'

Rick Moran
A sign of desperation? Can't see it any other way. The idea that Obama's political opponents are motivated by racism will apparently now be "mainstreamed" into the Democratic party's talking points against conservatives.

It's one thing for liberal bloggers and pundits to casually drop the "R" word in trying to smear administration opponents. But it appears, according to this Politico story by Jonathan Martin, that the race card will become an official meme of the Democrats when attacking their opponents:

"As far as African-Americans are concerned, we think most of it is," said Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas), when asked in an interview in between sessions how much of the more extreme anger at Obama is based upon his race. "And we think it's very unfortunate. We as African-American people of course are very sensitive to it."

Johnson is a somewhat-reserved, nine-term member of Congress, more gracious southern lady than racial bomb-thrower. She enjoyed a warm personal relationship with fellow Texan George W. Bush when he was in the White House and fondly recalled their ability to get along, divergent politics aside.

But she said the disdain for this president, especially sharp in her home state, had reached a point where it had become necessary to speak out.

"It's hurting the spirit of this country," Johnson said, citing concerns about what the rest of the world may think about a powerful nation where a significant segment of the population does not accept their elected leader as legitimate.

Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, agreed with his colleague that elements of the opposition can't accept the reality of a black president.

"There's a very angry, small group of folks that just didn't like the fact that Barack Obama won the presidency," Honda said, adding: "With some, I think it is [about race].

No one asked what the "rest of the world" thought when Democrats spent 8 years claiming that Bush stole both the 2000 and 2004 elections. But that's beside the point. It is apparent that many Democrats will embrace the race card - those that haven't already - and attempt to delegitimize opponent's arguments against the liberal policies of the president by smearing them as racists.

This not only shows that they are desperate but that they are unable to respond to criticisms. Rather than engage in debate, they simply wish to cut off discussion by branding their foes as haters.

The debate over the president's agenda is about to turn very ugly indeed.







A sign of desperation? Can't see it any other way. The idea that Obama's political opponents are motivated by racism will apparently now be "mainstreamed" into the Democratic party's talking points against conservatives.

It's one thing for liberal bloggers and pundits to casually drop the "R" word in trying to smear administration opponents. But it appears, according to this Politico story by Jonathan Martin, that the race card will become an official meme of the Democrats when attacking their opponents:

"As far as African-Americans are concerned, we think most of it is," said Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-Texas), when asked in an interview in between sessions how much of the more extreme anger at Obama is based upon his race. "And we think it's very unfortunate. We as African-American people of course are very sensitive to it."

Johnson is a somewhat-reserved, nine-term member of Congress, more gracious southern lady than racial bomb-thrower. She enjoyed a warm personal relationship with fellow Texan George W. Bush when he was in the White House and fondly recalled their ability to get along, divergent politics aside.

But she said the disdain for this president, especially sharp in her home state, had reached a point where it had become necessary to speak out.

"It's hurting the spirit of this country," Johnson said, citing concerns about what the rest of the world may think about a powerful nation where a significant segment of the population does not accept their elected leader as legitimate.

Rep. Mike Honda (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, agreed with his colleague that elements of the opposition can't accept the reality of a black president.

"There's a very angry, small group of folks that just didn't like the fact that Barack Obama won the presidency," Honda said, adding: "With some, I think it is [about race].

No one asked what the "rest of the world" thought when Democrats spent 8 years claiming that Bush stole both the 2000 and 2004 elections. But that's beside the point. It is apparent that many Democrats will embrace the race card - those that haven't already - and attempt to delegitimize opponent's arguments against the liberal policies of the president by smearing them as racists.

This not only shows that they are desperate but that they are unable to respond to criticisms. Rather than engage in debate, they simply wish to cut off discussion by branding their foes as haters.

The debate over the president's agenda is about to turn very ugly indeed.