Carter projecting his own racism on others

Jimmy Carter is projecting his own racism onto opponents of ObamaCare. Upper-class Democrats have traditionally charged their enemies of racism in the post-war era to distract audiences from their own ghastly histories. Of course, it is easier for Big Media to pretend to read the hearts of multiracial working-class protesters from afar than admit that Carter's was no true friend of the civil rights movement.
I suggest we focus on the historical facts at hand:

Jimmy Carter's church (like Obama's) promoted racism. But whereas we rightly associate Obama's with anti-European and anti-Semitic sermons, Carter's fringe Baptist church family actually "canceled services rather than admit four blacks," according to an Associated Press Report, dated November 2, 1976 (in the Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Mo.). 


Jimmy Carter attended a church where race-obsessed deacons enforced a 1965 resolution to exclude "Negroes or other civil rights activists." For years, the peanut farmer attended an openly racist church. Today, though, he magically reads the hearts and minds of Obama's critics.

Jimmy Carter -- like Obama -- tried to downplay and hide his religious leaders' racism: "For several years, the Plains Baptist Church has admitted worshipers without discrimination. I will seek church action to continue worship opportunities and also offer membership to those who live in our community and who share our religious faith." Yet, Carter failed to explain (a) why blacks were being kicked out of his church in 1976 and (b) why he attended an institution with a racist resolution.

I could go on. In more recent times (for example) Carter -- like the Reverend Wright -- openly railed against Zionist Jews, not blood thirsty Islamists. The key word here is "projection."  Obama certainly was (and probably still is) a Wright-wing extremist, but Carter is a seasoned hypocrite.
Jimmy Carter is projecting his own racism onto opponents of ObamaCare. Upper-class Democrats have traditionally charged their enemies of racism in the post-war era to distract audiences from their own ghastly histories. Of course, it is easier for Big Media to pretend to read the hearts of multiracial working-class protesters from afar than admit that Carter's was no true friend of the civil rights movement.
I suggest we focus on the historical facts at hand:

Jimmy Carter's church (like Obama's) promoted racism. But whereas we rightly associate Obama's with anti-European and anti-Semitic sermons, Carter's fringe Baptist church family actually "canceled services rather than admit four blacks," according to an Associated Press Report, dated November 2, 1976 (in the Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Mo.). 


Jimmy Carter attended a church where race-obsessed deacons enforced a 1965 resolution to exclude "Negroes or other civil rights activists." For years, the peanut farmer attended an openly racist church. Today, though, he magically reads the hearts and minds of Obama's critics.

Jimmy Carter -- like Obama -- tried to downplay and hide his religious leaders' racism: "For several years, the Plains Baptist Church has admitted worshipers without discrimination. I will seek church action to continue worship opportunities and also offer membership to those who live in our community and who share our religious faith." Yet, Carter failed to explain (a) why blacks were being kicked out of his church in 1976 and (b) why he attended an institution with a racist resolution.

I could go on. In more recent times (for example) Carter -- like the Reverend Wright -- openly railed against Zionist Jews, not blood thirsty Islamists. The key word here is "projection."  Obama certainly was (and probably still is) a Wright-wing extremist, but Carter is a seasoned hypocrite.