Axelrod: Protests don't mean much

The master of astroturfing doesn't think much of the turnout in DC for the 9/12 protests.

Obama advisor David Axelrod is quite dismissive of the massive outpouring of disgust at his boss, saying, it doesn't represent "the mainstream."

Manu Raju of Politico:


President Barack Obama's senior adviser, David Axelrod, said Sunday conservative protests in Washington are not indicative of the country's mood.

Conservatives have the right to protest, Axelrod said on CBS's "Face the Nation, but "they don't represent a mainstream view."

In early CBS excerpts from a taped "60 Minutes" interview to air Sunday night, Obama says on the 24-hour news cycle, "the loudest shrillest voices get the most attention."

"One of the things I'm trying to figure out is how can we make sure civility is interesting," Obama said.

One way to make civility "interesting" Mr. President is to, like, you know, PRACTICE IT on occasion.

Instead of calling opponents to your policies "liars," and tools of the insurance industry," maybe you could acknowledge that their principles require them to reject your big government solutions to our health care problems.

That would be a good start.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky




The master of astroturfing doesn't think much of the turnout in DC for the 9/12 protests.

Obama advisor David Axelrod is quite dismissive of the massive outpouring of disgust at his boss, saying, it doesn't represent "the mainstream."

Manu Raju of Politico:


President Barack Obama's senior adviser, David Axelrod, said Sunday conservative protests in Washington are not indicative of the country's mood.

Conservatives have the right to protest, Axelrod said on CBS's "Face the Nation, but "they don't represent a mainstream view."

In early CBS excerpts from a taped "60 Minutes" interview to air Sunday night, Obama says on the 24-hour news cycle, "the loudest shrillest voices get the most attention."

"One of the things I'm trying to figure out is how can we make sure civility is interesting," Obama said.

One way to make civility "interesting" Mr. President is to, like, you know, PRACTICE IT on occasion.

Instead of calling opponents to your policies "liars," and tools of the insurance industry," maybe you could acknowledge that their principles require them to reject your big government solutions to our health care problems.

That would be a good start.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky