Privacy and Obamacare

The Washington Times has a great editorial today on the dangers posed to the privacy of our medical records if Obamacare passes.

Basically, it comes down to a provision in the proposed bill that would allow the IRS and Social Security Administration to share information with the new health choice commissioner regarding your private medical information.

Worse, it would authorize the Social Security Administration to obtain tax information to see if you're eligible for benefits under Obamacare.

The Times reminds us where this kind of government intrusion can lead:

Both the left and the right are raising concerns about these invasions of privacy. The Electronic Privacy Information Center announced it opposes these provisions because the legislation "violates the intent of the Privacy Act which generally requires agencies to obtain information directly from individuals and not from other agencies." The Institute for Policy Innovation likewise worries: "How many thousands of federal employees will have access to your records? The privacy of your health records will be only as good as the most nosy, most dishonest and most malcontented federal employee."

Many government employees wouldn't abuse access to this information, but if you want to know what life can be like with this personal information floating around, ask Joe Wurzelbacher, known popularly as Joe the Plumber. After asking candidate Barack Obama a question and accidentally becoming a sideshow of last autumn's presidential campaign, Joe the Plumber was the victim of Obama supporters within the Ohio state government who searched documents for embarrassing details about him. That personal information was leaked to the press.

Even a well-meaning government can easily turn into an oppressive government. Bureaucrats have no right to minute details about our personal lives, but government health care would hand it all over.

The Joe the Plumber example is instructive. Anyone who speaks out against the government - Republican or Democrat - could find their personal information plastered all over the news. Just the fact that such a possibility exists chills free speech.

Not that we needed another reason to oppose this monstrosity...

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky




The Washington Times has a great editorial today on the dangers posed to the privacy of our medical records if Obamacare passes.

Basically, it comes down to a provision in the proposed bill that would allow the IRS and Social Security Administration to share information with the new health choice commissioner regarding your private medical information.

Worse, it would authorize the Social Security Administration to obtain tax information to see if you're eligible for benefits under Obamacare.

The Times reminds us where this kind of government intrusion can lead:

Both the left and the right are raising concerns about these invasions of privacy. The Electronic Privacy Information Center announced it opposes these provisions because the legislation "violates the intent of the Privacy Act which generally requires agencies to obtain information directly from individuals and not from other agencies." The Institute for Policy Innovation likewise worries: "How many thousands of federal employees will have access to your records? The privacy of your health records will be only as good as the most nosy, most dishonest and most malcontented federal employee."

Many government employees wouldn't abuse access to this information, but if you want to know what life can be like with this personal information floating around, ask Joe Wurzelbacher, known popularly as Joe the Plumber. After asking candidate Barack Obama a question and accidentally becoming a sideshow of last autumn's presidential campaign, Joe the Plumber was the victim of Obama supporters within the Ohio state government who searched documents for embarrassing details about him. That personal information was leaked to the press.

Even a well-meaning government can easily turn into an oppressive government. Bureaucrats have no right to minute details about our personal lives, but government health care would hand it all over.

The Joe the Plumber example is instructive. Anyone who speaks out against the government - Republican or Democrat - could find their personal information plastered all over the news. Just the fact that such a possibility exists chills free speech.

Not that we needed another reason to oppose this monstrosity...

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky