Government healthcare horror

In case there is anyone out there who still believes that we should turn over our health care to the government these three stories about the UK's infamous National Health Service should make them reconsider.

From The
Daily Mail: "The babies born in hospital corridors: Bed shortage forces 4,000 mothers to give birth in lifts, offices and hospital toilets"

Thousands of women are having to give birth outside maternity wards because of a lack of midwives and hospital beds.

The lives of mothers and babies are being put at risk as births in locations ranging from lifts to toilets -- even a caravan -- went up 15 per cent last year to almost 4,000.

Health chiefs admit a lack of maternity beds is partly to blame for the crisis, with hundreds of women in labour being turned away from hospitals because they are full. [....]

Babies were born in offices, lifts, toilets and a caravan, according to the Freedom of Information data for 2007 and 2008 from 117 out of 147 trusts which provide maternity services. [....]

Tory health spokesman Andrew Lansley, who obtained the figures, said Labour had cut maternity beds by 2,340, or 22 per cent, since 1997. At the same time birth rates have been rising sharply - up 20 per cent in some areas.

Notice there is no mention of a doctor ever delivering a baby, only midwives. Apparently having a doctor deliver a baby in the UK is not even a consideration.

Here is outrageous headline number two from the
Daily Mail: "Man collapses with ruptured appendix... three weeks after NHS doctors 'took it out.'"

After weeks of excruciating pain, Mark Wattson was understandably relieved to have his appendix taken out.

Doctors told him the operation was a success and he was sent home.

But only a month later the 35-year-old collapsed in agony and had to be taken back to Great Western Hospital in Swindon by ambulance.

To his shock, surgeons from the same team told him that not only was his appendix still inside him, but it had ruptured - a potentially fatal complication.

In a second operation it was finally removed, leaving Mr Wattson fearing another organ might have been taken out during the first procedure.

The blunder has left Mr Wattson jobless, as bosses at the shop where he worked did not believe his story and sacked him.

Mr Wattson told of the moment he realised there had been a serious mistake.

'I was lying on a stretcher in terrible pain and a doctor came up to me and said that my appendix had burst,' he said.
But wait... There's more from The Telegraph: " 'Cruel and neglectful' care of one million NHS patients exposed"

In the last six years, the Patients Association claims hundreds of thousands have suffered from poor standards of nursing, often with 'neglectful, demeaning, painful and sometimes downright cruel' treatment.

The charity has disclosed a horrifying catalogue of elderly people left in pain, in soiled bed clothes, denied adequate food and drink, and suffering from repeatedly cancelled operations, missed diagnoses and dismissive staff.

The Patients Association said the dossier proves that while the scale of the scandal at Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust - where up to 1,200 people died through failings in urgent care - was a one off, there are repeated examples they have uncovered of the same appalling standards throughout the NHS.

All government run health care systems have a common problem. Due to government bureaucracy and inefficiency there is never enough money, so services are continually cut: "Labour had cut maternity beds by 2,340, or 22 per cent, since 1997." Then the service provided reaches a critical point and the MSM finally wakes up and reports on the crisis. At this point the embarrassed government officials promise to fix the problem.

What you have in these health care systems is a kind of seesaw effect, where a crisis builds to a breaking point and eventually some remedial action is taken. Then things settle down until the next crisis appears. Is it any wonder Americans shun this type of system?
In case there is anyone out there who still believes that we should turn over our health care to the government these three stories about the UK's infamous National Health Service should make them reconsider.

From The
Daily Mail: "The babies born in hospital corridors: Bed shortage forces 4,000 mothers to give birth in lifts, offices and hospital toilets"

Thousands of women are having to give birth outside maternity wards because of a lack of midwives and hospital beds.

The lives of mothers and babies are being put at risk as births in locations ranging from lifts to toilets -- even a caravan -- went up 15 per cent last year to almost 4,000.

Health chiefs admit a lack of maternity beds is partly to blame for the crisis, with hundreds of women in labour being turned away from hospitals because they are full. [....]

Babies were born in offices, lifts, toilets and a caravan, according to the Freedom of Information data for 2007 and 2008 from 117 out of 147 trusts which provide maternity services. [....]

Tory health spokesman Andrew Lansley, who obtained the figures, said Labour had cut maternity beds by 2,340, or 22 per cent, since 1997. At the same time birth rates have been rising sharply - up 20 per cent in some areas.

Notice there is no mention of a doctor ever delivering a baby, only midwives. Apparently having a doctor deliver a baby in the UK is not even a consideration.

Here is outrageous headline number two from the
Daily Mail: "Man collapses with ruptured appendix... three weeks after NHS doctors 'took it out.'"

After weeks of excruciating pain, Mark Wattson was understandably relieved to have his appendix taken out.

Doctors told him the operation was a success and he was sent home.

But only a month later the 35-year-old collapsed in agony and had to be taken back to Great Western Hospital in Swindon by ambulance.

To his shock, surgeons from the same team told him that not only was his appendix still inside him, but it had ruptured - a potentially fatal complication.

In a second operation it was finally removed, leaving Mr Wattson fearing another organ might have been taken out during the first procedure.

The blunder has left Mr Wattson jobless, as bosses at the shop where he worked did not believe his story and sacked him.

Mr Wattson told of the moment he realised there had been a serious mistake.

'I was lying on a stretcher in terrible pain and a doctor came up to me and said that my appendix had burst,' he said.
But wait... There's more from The Telegraph: " 'Cruel and neglectful' care of one million NHS patients exposed"

In the last six years, the Patients Association claims hundreds of thousands have suffered from poor standards of nursing, often with 'neglectful, demeaning, painful and sometimes downright cruel' treatment.

The charity has disclosed a horrifying catalogue of elderly people left in pain, in soiled bed clothes, denied adequate food and drink, and suffering from repeatedly cancelled operations, missed diagnoses and dismissive staff.

The Patients Association said the dossier proves that while the scale of the scandal at Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust - where up to 1,200 people died through failings in urgent care - was a one off, there are repeated examples they have uncovered of the same appalling standards throughout the NHS.

All government run health care systems have a common problem. Due to government bureaucracy and inefficiency there is never enough money, so services are continually cut: "Labour had cut maternity beds by 2,340, or 22 per cent, since 1997." Then the service provided reaches a critical point and the MSM finally wakes up and reports on the crisis. At this point the embarrassed government officials promise to fix the problem.

What you have in these health care systems is a kind of seesaw effect, where a crisis builds to a breaking point and eventually some remedial action is taken. Then things settle down until the next crisis appears. Is it any wonder Americans shun this type of system?