Obama's war on American sovereignty

Andrew McCarthy explains on NRO what's really going on with AG Holder's investigation of the CIA over interrogation techniques. It's what McCarthy delicately calls Obama's "fondness for transnationalism," or what I would call his war on American sovereignty.

In lucid terms, McCarthy examines the legal doctrines being pursued by Obama appointees, and explains what's really going on. The article is a must-read, for all this information, but the conclusion is a stunner:

Transnationalists from outside and, now, inside our government have been ardent supporters of prosecutions against American officials who designed and carried out the Bush counterterrorism policies that kept this country safe after 9/11. The U.N.'s top torture monitor is demanding legal action, almost certainly as a prelude to calling for action by an international tribunal -- such as the ICC -- if the Justice Department fails to indict. Meantime, law-enforcement authorities in Spain and elsewhere are weighing charges against the same U.S. officials, spurred on by the CCR and human-rights groups that now have friends in high American places. In foreign and international courts, the terrorist-friendly legal standards preferred by Europe and the U.N. would make convictions easier to obtain and civil suits easier to win.

Andrew McCarthy explains on NRO what's really going on with AG Holder's investigation of the CIA over interrogation techniques. It's what McCarthy delicately calls Obama's "fondness for transnationalism," or what I would call his war on American sovereignty.

In lucid terms, McCarthy examines the legal doctrines being pursued by Obama appointees, and explains what's really going on. The article is a must-read, for all this information, but the conclusion is a stunner:

Transnationalists from outside and, now, inside our government have been ardent supporters of prosecutions against American officials who designed and carried out the Bush counterterrorism policies that kept this country safe after 9/11. The U.N.'s top torture monitor is demanding legal action, almost certainly as a prelude to calling for action by an international tribunal -- such as the ICC -- if the Justice Department fails to indict. Meantime, law-enforcement authorities in Spain and elsewhere are weighing charges against the same U.S. officials, spurred on by the CCR and human-rights groups that now have friends in high American places. In foreign and international courts, the terrorist-friendly legal standards preferred by Europe and the U.N. would make convictions easier to obtain and civil suits easier to win.