Obama's Tone Deafness

The WSJ's Dorothy Rabinowitz skewers the President and his tone deaf campaign for health care reform  

The election over, the warming glow of those armies of supporters gone, his capacity to tolerate criticism and dissent from his policies grows thinner apace. His lectures, explaining his health-care proposals, and why they'll be good for everybody, are clearly not going down well with his national audience.

This would have to do with the fact that the real Barack Obama -- product of the academic left, social reformer with a program, is now before that audience, and what they hear in this lecture about one of the central concerns in their lives -- his message freighted with generalities -- they are not prepared to buy. They are not prepared to believe that our first most important concern now is health-care reform or all will go under.

The president has a problem. For, despite a great election victory, Mr. Obama, it becomes ever clearer, knows little about Americans. He knows the crowds -- he is at home with those. He is a stranger to the country's heart and character.

h/t: CH
The WSJ's Dorothy Rabinowitz skewers the President and his tone deaf campaign for health care reform  

The election over, the warming glow of those armies of supporters gone, his capacity to tolerate criticism and dissent from his policies grows thinner apace. His lectures, explaining his health-care proposals, and why they'll be good for everybody, are clearly not going down well with his national audience.

This would have to do with the fact that the real Barack Obama -- product of the academic left, social reformer with a program, is now before that audience, and what they hear in this lecture about one of the central concerns in their lives -- his message freighted with generalities -- they are not prepared to buy. They are not prepared to believe that our first most important concern now is health-care reform or all will go under.

The president has a problem. For, despite a great election victory, Mr. Obama, it becomes ever clearer, knows little about Americans. He knows the crowds -- he is at home with those. He is a stranger to the country's heart and character.

h/t: CH