Mary Robinson and terror against civilians

Thomas Lifson
Mary Robinson, slated to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, apparently accepted terrorist acts against innocent civilians as legitimate, as chair of the UN Human Rights Commision. Michael Rubin, on Enterprise blog, points to the evidence:

At the April 2002 session, the commission voted (and passed) a resolution endorsing "all available means, including armed struggle" to establish a Palestinian state. Put aside whatever one thinks about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. International law bases itself on precedent, and the UN Human Rights Commission chose specifically not to exempt suicide bombing-a plague of which had erupted in 2001-2002-from "all available means." While the question on Robinson's agenda may have involved Israel and Palestine, the answer was just as relevant to Sri Lanka, Great Britain, Pakistan, and Lebanon. This is why Canada, Britain, and Germany voted against the measure. Basically, under Robinson's stewardship, the commission decided to recognize the murder of non-combatant men, women, and children on buses and in cafes as legal.

On National Review's Corner, he drives home the key question which the Obama administration vetting process failed to include.

Do you, Ms. Robinson, believe that suicide terrorism directed at U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan is legitimate under humanitarian law?

The award ceremony will take place August 12. How many demonstrators will be outside?

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

Mary Robinson, slated to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, apparently accepted terrorist acts against innocent civilians as legitimate, as chair of the UN Human Rights Commision. Michael Rubin, on Enterprise blog, points to the evidence:

At the April 2002 session, the commission voted (and passed) a resolution endorsing "all available means, including armed struggle" to establish a Palestinian state. Put aside whatever one thinks about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. International law bases itself on precedent, and the UN Human Rights Commission chose specifically not to exempt suicide bombing-a plague of which had erupted in 2001-2002-from "all available means." While the question on Robinson's agenda may have involved Israel and Palestine, the answer was just as relevant to Sri Lanka, Great Britain, Pakistan, and Lebanon. This is why Canada, Britain, and Germany voted against the measure. Basically, under Robinson's stewardship, the commission decided to recognize the murder of non-combatant men, women, and children on buses and in cafes as legal.

On National Review's Corner, he drives home the key question which the Obama administration vetting process failed to include.

Do you, Ms. Robinson, believe that suicide terrorism directed at U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan is legitimate under humanitarian law?

The award ceremony will take place August 12. How many demonstrators will be outside?

Hat tip: Ed Lasky